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Kutztown University Geology field trip to Adirondacks 2013Kutztown University Geology Courses

Degree requirements for Bachelor of Science - Geology

Course descriptions

GEL 001- Dinosaurs
GEL 020 - Introduction to Geology
GEL 031 - Geology of National Parks and Monuments
GEL 100 - Physical Geology
GEL 102 - Historical Geology
GEL 110 - Introduction to Oceanography
GEL 200 - Field Geology
GEL 205 - Planetary Surface Processes
GEL 210 - Environmental Geology
GEL 220 - Mineralogy
GEL 230 - Paleontology
GEL 237 - Field Methods in Oceanography
GEL 302 - Economic Geology
GEL 304 - Structural Geology
GEL 316 - Petrology and Geochemistry
GEL 324 - Geomorphology
GEL 346 - Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
GEL 358 - General Geophysics
GEL 362 - Hydrogeology
GEL 366 - Marine Geology
GEL 368 - Research in Geology I
GEL 369 - Research in Geology II
GEL 371, 372, & 373 - Seminar Topics in Geology
GEL 380 - Senior Seminar in Geology
GEL 390 - Internship in Geology

GEL 001- Dinosaurs
This course is an introduction to the paleontology of dinosaurs. The evolution, systematics, origin, history of their discovery, and current topics concerning dinosaurs are discussed. This course does not satisfy major, concomitant, or specialization requirements for Secondary Education and/or Liberal Arts and Science majors.
Prerequisites:
None.
Dr. Edward Simpson
maniraptoran_digging drawing by Max Needle
Picture Credit: Max Needle
(Kutztown University geology alumnus
)
GEL 020 - Introduction to Geology
An introduction to the study of the earth, physical geology includes the study of the formation of common rocks and minerals, of the structure of the surface of the earth, and of geological processes that create the surface landscape. Human considerations such as energy, mineral deposits and environmental hazards are also examined. Laboratory work includes the study of rocks and minerals, and the study of topographic maps and landforms. This course does not satisfy major, concomitant or specialization requirements for Secondary Education Science and/or Liberal Arts Science Majors.
Prerequisites: None.
Dr. Kurt Friehauf or
Dr. Jacob Sewall or
Dr. Sarah Tindall or
Dr. Adrienne Oakley
GEL 031 - Geology of National Parks and Monuments
This course is an introduction to the study of historical and physical geologic principles as illustrated in the National Parks and Monuments of the U.S. The Earth's history, geological surface and subsurface processes and the genesis of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks are examined. This course does not satisfy major, concomitant, or specialization requirements for Secondary Education and/or Liberal Arts and Science majors.
Prerequisites: None.
Dr. Kurt Friehauf
Canon de
              Chelly
GEL 100 - Physical Geology
An introduction to earth processes, physical geology includes the study of the formation of common rocks, minerals and economic mineral deposits, the structure of the earth's interior, and geological processes that create the surface landscape. Human and environmental hazards are also examined. Laboratory work includes the study of rocks, minerals, topographic maps, landforms, and geologic maps. Field trips may also be required.
Prerequisites: (Students are expected to have had adequate high school preparation in algebra, trigonometry, and chemistry). Required of majors in the Earth-Space Sciences.
Dr. Laura Sherrod
Physical
              Geology
GEL 102 - Historical Geology
An introduction to the geological and biological evolution of the earth, historical geology traces the history of the earth as recorded in the rock record. The scientific methods by which geologists interpret the earth history are introduced. Field trips may be required. Required of majors in the Earth-Space Sciences. Offered Spring Semester.
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology or GEL 020 Introduction to Geology.
Dr. Jacob Sewall

GEL 110 - Introduction to Oceanography
An introductory course designed to introduce students from diverse backgrounds to the physical, chemical, biological and geological aspects of the oceans and to the methods and techniques of this rapidly expanding field. Emphasis is placed on lab and at-sea assignments which focus the students' attention on the interrelationship and unity of oceanography, and its relation to other environmental sciences.
Prerequisites: None.
Dr. Adrienne Oakley
Intro to
              Oceanography
GEL 200 - Field Geology
Methods of geological survey involving field practice, interpretation of selected areas, and preparation of maps, and reports. Lectures and laboratories.
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology and GEL 102 Historical Geology.
Dr. Sarah Tindall or Dr. Kurt Friehauf
Field
              Geology
GEL 205 - Planetary Surface Processes
Analysis of how natural forces shape the landscapes of Earth and other planets. Lectures and laboratories.
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology and GEL 102 Historical Geology.
Dr. Erin Kraal
Valles Marineris - Mars
GEL 210 - Environmental Geology
A study of the relationship between man and his geological habitat. Problems that society faces in using the earth are examined, including case histories of natural disasters and human interactions with earth materials. Geo-chemical cycles, geological materials, and land use will be examined as they relate to environmental quality.
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology.
Dr. Jacob Sewall
Environmental
              Geology
GEL 220 - Mineralogy
An introduction to the structure and chemistry of minerals allows development of an understanding of how minerals form and why they have specific physical and chemical properties. Laboratory work emphasizes a wide variety of practical techniques for the identification of minerals both in the lab and in the field.
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology and facility with General Chemistry and Trigonometry.
Dr. Kurt Friehauf
Mineralogy
GEL 230 - Paleontology
This course is a study of invertebrate and lower vertebrate life as revealed in the fossil record. The invertebrate phyla are used to illustrate evolutionary patterns, speciation, and the use of fossils in stratigraphy. The invertebrates and lower vertebrates are treated systematically. Chief emphasis is on organic hard parts. Fossils are collected in the field, then prepared and identified in the laboratory.
Prerequisites: GEL 102 Historical Geology.
Dr. Edward Simpson
amphibian
              impressions
GEL 237 - Field Methods in Oceanography
A course to familiarize students with the dynamic marine environment and field work on board small research vessels; to instruct in the use and application of standard oceanographic instruments and sampling devices; to promote and encourage independent research through the initial stages of a scientific project.
Prerequisites: GEL/MAR 110 Introduction to Marine Sciences or consent of the instructor.
Dr. Adrienne Oakley
Intro to Oceanography
GEL 302 - Economic Geology
All metals, many raw chemicals, and other materials in our daily lives, including glass, ceramic, aggregate, and cement, are won from the earth by mining mineral deposits.  Economic geology is the study of how these mineral deposits form within the earth and how we explore for them.  This course in economic geology will investigate both the processes that form mineral deposits, as well as practical exploration strategies currently used in industry.
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology
Dr. Kurt Friehauf
Economic
              Geology
GEL 304 - Structural Geology
Structural geology studies the way rocks deform on scales ranging from the microscopic to plate tectonic. This course investigates how rock fold, fracture, and even flow. This knowledge leads to an understanding of how mountain ranges form, where natural resources occur, where groundwater pollutants migrate, and what controls ground stability in construction. The course also explores the history of the earth from a plate tectonics perspective. Projects include both laboratory studies and mapping exercises of deformed rocks in the field.
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology and GEL 102 Historical Geology.
Dr. Sarah Tindall
Structural Geology
GEL 316 - Petrology and Geochemistry
This course introduces the fundamentals of geochemistry in the context of igneous and metamorphic petrology. Understanding the basic principles of the chemical processes within the earth sets the stage for investigations of how magmas form and crystallize, and how pressure, temperature, and fluid-rock interaction change rock mineralogy and texture. Understanding the environments in which rocks form leads to the development of models of geologic processes that form these kinds of rocks. Laboratory work focuses on practical application of these concepts to mapping rocks in the field and studies of rock suites from all over the globe using petrographic microscopes.
Prerequisites:
GEL 220 Mineralogy, CHM 100 General Chemistry I.
Dr. Kurt Friehauf
Petrology and
              Geochemistry
GEL 324 - Geomorphology
The study of the dynamic and tectonic processes that, in conjunction with the climatic and biologic forces, have shaped the earth's present form and are constantly reshaping and modifying it. The constructive forces of vulcanism and diastrophism and the activities of weathering and erosion in the formation of the surface features of the earth are considered. The interpretation of geologic and topographic maps, laboratory exercises, as well as individual field studies, are an important part of the course. Laboratory work and field trips are required.
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology.

GEL 346 - Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
The basic composition, transport, diagenesis and distribution of sediments are introduced along with the principles governing the classification, correlation, interpretation, of stratified rocks are presented by means of lectures, laboratory exercises and field trips. Laboratory exercises demonstrate procedures used in analyzing and presenting stratigraphic data. Field trips are employed to introduce the student to stratigraphic principles and local stratigraphic problems.
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology, and either GEL 102 Historical Geology, GEL/MAR 366 Marine Geology, or permission of instructor.
Dr. Edward Simpson or Dr. Jacob Sewall
Ed Simpson's
              sed class in Virginia
GEL 358 - General Geophysics
The study of earthquake seismology and the basic geophysical methods such as gravity, magnetics, seismic refraction, seismic reflection, electrical resistivity, and electro-logging. The laboratory exercises and field work using portable geophysical equipment will familiarize the students with the various methods used to collect and interpret geophysical data. (This course is also offered under the MAR 358 designation.)
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology or GEL/MAR 110 Introduction to Marine Sciences and PHY 040/042 or PHY 100/102.
Dr. Laura Sherrod
Geophysics

GEL 362 - Hydrogeology
This course deals with the study of the subsurface waters of the Earth, their occurrence, circulation and distribution, their chemical and physical properties and their relation to the geologic environment. The laboratory exercises and field work will familiarize students with various methods used to collect and interpret hydrological data.
Prerequisites: Two semesters of Geology/Marine Science and PHY 040-041, PHY 042-043 or PHY 100-101, PHY 102-103.
Dr. Laura Sherrod
Hydrogeology
GEL 366 - Marine Geology
A study of the structural and sedimentary environments of the continental shelf, slopes, and ocean basins. The crustal structure of the earth and its relation to the sedimentary record and geologic history of the ocean is examined. Sampling and laboratory procedures used by the marine geologist are introduced.
Prerequisites: GEL 100 Physical Geology, or MAR 110 Introduction to Marine Sciences, or consent of instructor.
Dr. Adrienne Oakley
Dr. Adrienne
              Oakley's Marine Geology field trip
GEL 368 - Research in Geology I
This course involves field, laboratory and library research on a topic of geological nature. The work will be supervised by a faculty member and the research topic will be acceptable to both the supervising faculty member and the student. The combined credit total for Research in Geology I and II is up to 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours of geology courses and consent of the instructor.

GEL 369 - Research in Geology II
This course allows a student to continue working on a project which was started in GEL 370 or to investigate a new topic. The work will be supervised by a faculty member and the research topic will be acceptable to both the supervising faculty member and the student. The combined credit total for Research in Geology I and II is up to 6 semester hours.
Prerequisites:
GEL 368 Research in Geology I and consent of the instructor.

GEL 371, 372, and 373 - Seminar Topics in Geology
Through individualized instruction or in small group seminars, the student will study a timely or specialized topic in Geology. The most appropriate media of instruction will be chosen to meet the specific goals of student and instructor, and these may include faculty and guest lectures, discussion, problem sets, completion of a review paper, student oral presentations, field trips, and student projects which do not fall into the category of laboratory research.
Prerequisites: Prior to registration, the student must arrange for a faculty supervisor and obtain the permission of the Department Chairperson. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 total hours credit.

GEL 380 - Senior Seminar in Geology
Readings and discussions in the area of the individual student's interest in preparation for the comprehensive examination in Geology. Required of all Liberal Arts students majoring in Geology.
Prerequisites: Many.

GEL 390 - Internship in Geology
Supervised, practical work experience in laboratory and/or field situations. Students interested in developing an individualized vocationally oriented program which may assist in future career options may structure a work-study experience with the cooperating agency or organization. A proposal outlining the work-study experience should be submitted to the student's supervising faculty member and the department chairperson. Clock hours will be determined by the cooperating agency or organization. Semester hour credit will be based upon the proposal and scheduled clock hours, but a maximum of 4 credits may be applied toward Arts and Sciences electives. Additional credit cannot be applied to the 128 credit hour graduation requirements.
Prerequisites: Junior and Senior standing and approval of department head.


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Kurt Friehauf - February 2014