Effective with the fall semester of 2007, in order to meet the requirements of Middle States and other accrediting agencies, all course proposals must carry a list of instruments used to assess students’ achievement of the course objectives (see either the Format for Course Proposals or the Bylaws for more information). The composition of this list and the nature of the assessments themselves are at the discretion of the submitting department. Below are examples of how five different courses handle assessment in their course syllabi, along with two examples of "omnibus" assessment pieces. (These are merely examples and are not meant to construe specific content or format.)

EXAMPLE 1:

EDU 100 Perspectives on American Education

Assessment of each teacher candidate’s level of accomplishment with reference to the course objectives will be based upon a subset of the following:

    1. Objective tests.
    2. Writing assignments.
    3. Group and solo presentation on educational topics.
    4. Essays.
    5. Midterm examination.
    6. Library research project.
    7. Written personal philosophy of education.
    8. Management plan.
    9. Final examination.
    10. Active participation in class and in discussions.

EXAMPLE 2:

SEU 323 Methods of Teaching Secondary School Subjects-Mathematics

Assessment of each student’s level of accomplishment with reference to the course objectives will be based upon a subset of the following:

    1. Active participation in class and in discussions.
    2. Completion of seven lesson plans on a variety of topics in the 6-12 curriculum.
    3. Creation of an interactive bulletin board.
    4. Creation of a self-guided activity sheet to teach students how to use Geometer’s Sketchpad.
    5. Creation of a self-guided activity sheet to teach students how to use Microsoft Excel.
    6. Creation of a self-guided discovery activity sheet to teach students how to work with the graphing calculator.
    7. A project to analyze lesson plans to determine how well they follow the NCTM and PA Standards.
    8. A written analysis of the field experience.
    9. Two practice lessons taught to the rest of the class.
    10. Three article reviews.
    11. A term paper.
    12. A midterm examination.
    13. A final examination.

EXAMPLE 3:

ENG 364 Modern Poetry

Assessment of each student’s level of accomplishment with reference to the course objectives will be based upon a subset of the following:

    1. Active participation in class and in discussions.
    2. Examinations.
    3. Quizzes.
    4. Reader Response Papers.
    5. Individual or Group Presentations.
    6. A Portfolio.
    7. Analytic and/or Research Papers.
    8. Class Leadership.
    9. Exercises.
    10. Media Projects.
    11. Service Projects.
    12. Peer Review.

EXAMPLE 4:

SPU 040 Survey of Speech Problems

Assessment of each student’s level of accomplishment with reference to the course objectives will be based upon a subset of the following:

    1. Demonstration of the ability to organize a portfolio of information related to the profession of Speech and Language Pathology by submitting the portfolio for graded review at the end of the semester.
    2. Demonstration of knowledge of the basic anatomy, physiology, etiology and knowledge of communication disorders through the use of midterm and final examinations, quizzes and graded classroom projects.
    3. Demonstration of a basic understanding of how to evaluate and work with a variety of communication disorders using audio and video recordings, classroom group projects, midterm and final exams.
    4. Demonstration of competency in the use of terminology related to the profession of Speech and Language Pathology through class discussions, quizzes, classroom group projects, midterm and final exams.
    5. Demonstration of the knowledge of the existence of commercial materials available for use in evaluating and treating individuals with communication disorders using group projects, midterm, and final exams.

EXAMPLE 5:

ARU 110: Teaching Art and Visual Culture in Elementary Settings

Assessment of each teacher candidate’s level of accomplishment with reference to the course objectives will be based upon a subset of the following:

    • Critical Responses, in which the teacher candidate applies critical perspectives to art, design, and visual culture. These perspectives will be demonstrated through a range of linguistic and performative tasks.
    • Interview with Child, in which teacher candidates interview a child between the ages of 5-11 to apply their understanding of elementary learner behaviors in terms of individual and social development, institutional structures, appropriate classroom environment, and artistic and critical practices.
    • Journal/Sketchbook, in which teacher candidates complete ongoing written reflections on discussions, experiences and individual research on teaching art and visual culture in elementary settings.
    • Lesson Plan, in which teacher candidates apply their understanding of social development, institutional structures, and artistic and critical practices to the planning of curriculum, instruction, and assessment for elementary settings. The ability to create meaningful lesson plans is an essential and fundamental skill in the field of art education.
    • Model Teaching, in which teacher candidates present to their peers to demonstrate their understanding of ways to facilitate learning in the elementary settings, including the use of technology, human diversity, atypical learning, and integrated approaches to instruction.
    • Philosophy, in which teacher candidates develop and expand upon their philosophy of education. The philosophy statement will reflect perspectives derived from course content and incorporate elements uniquely situated in elementary contexts. This philosophy statement will culminate in a statement written during their clinical experience.
    • Professional Conduct, in which teacher candidates are evaluated on their disposition toward having a professional relationship with the field of art education. This relationship will be assessed through speech acts, actions, written work, community support and professional communications in a range of settings both on campus and off.
    • Reading Response, in which teacher candidates apply their knowledge, interpretation, and judgment of current research in the field of art education in elementary settings.
    • Site Report, in which teacher candidates observe in the field and then explain, interpret, and make judgments about the elementary learner behaviors, instructional practices, and curriculum materials in terms of individual and social development, appropriate classroom environment, and artistic and critical practices in elementary settings.
    • Studio Projects, in which teacher candidates create works of art to demonstrate an understanding of the arts as forms of inquiry and expression within individual, social, cultural and historical contexts.
    • Teaching in Field, in which teacher candidates teach in the field to demonstrate their understanding and skill to facilitate learning in the elementary settings, including the use of technology, human diversity, atypical learning, and integrated approaches to instruction.
    • Tests and Quizzes, in which teacher candidates demonstrate their knowledge of visual and material culture, art education, instruction, curricula, and human development.

EXAMPLE 6 ("Omnibus"):

CSC Courses

The following assessment applies to all course syllabi with the CSC prefix that do not already have an assessment section:

  • The course assessment will be a subset of tests, projects, papers, presentations, quizzes, homework, team assignments, and final exam.

EXAMPLE 7 ("Omnibus"):

SPA Courses

The following assessment applies to all course syllabi with the SPA prefix that do not already have an assessment section:

  • The course assessment will be a subset of tests, projects, papers, presentations, quizzes, homework, group assignments, participation and the final exam.