Course Offerings

Find below a list of the courses taught regularly by Secondary Education faculty, as well as course descriptions, credit values, prerequisites, and General Education categories. For more information and course availability, see KU's Course Catalog

EDU Courses

Courses denoted with an asterisk (*) are available to Undergraduate & Graduate students.

  • EDU 100CT - Perspectives on American Education
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate
    • Gen Ed Category B

    The course will provide an introduction and overview to the philosophy, history, sociology, and organization of American education. The study of American education will stress the relationships among social, economic, and cultural forces affecting the development of public education; historical and philosophical perspectives will be investigated.

  • EDU 120CD - Hip Hop and Multicultural Education
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate
    • Gen Ed Category D

    This course will investigate the connections between Hip-Hop culture, approaches to educating traditionally marginalized youth, and the way in which schooling can be constructed and disseminated in Hip-Hop. We will analyze the culture of Hip-Hop in an educational context and consider why rappers and effective teachers, how Hip-Hop is structured in ways that support argumentation and communication, and the ways in which traditional content courses can be taught using components of Hip-Hop culture. Once an understanding of Hip-Hop culture has been established, the term ‘multicultural education’ will be interrogated and lead students to question whether or not multicultural education has true meaning in current research and practice in education. This course will combine scholarship and theory with considerable exposure to various Hip-Hop songs and artists.

  • EDU 150CD - Meeting the Instructional Needs of English Language Learners
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate
    • Gen Ed Category B

    This course will provide teacher candidates with information about English Language Learners (ELLs) in American classrooms. The course will address principles of second language learning and teaching, English language acquisition, Cultural Diversity and lesson planning and delivery, PA English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), Research-Based teaching methods, and varied assessments. Additionally, current federal, state, and local regulations relative to ELLs will be presented.

  • EDU 326 - Introduction to Middle Level Education
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate
    • Prerequisites: COE students only, clearances

    The philosophy, history, structure, and future direction of middle-level education and how these topics relate to the characteristics of the young adolescent will be explored. Students will have the opportunity to explore the middle school concept, including curriculum and instructional strategies that are particularly appropriate for this age group. Observations in schools with culturally diverse populations and special needs students will target developmentally appropriate practice.

  • EDU 428 - Culture and Diversity of English Learners *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate
    • Prerequisites: Students that have taken EDU 528 Student Diversity & Critical Pedagogy cannot take EDU 428.


    This course is designed to prepare English as a Second Language (ESL) program specialists to facilitate the integration of English Language Learners (ELLs) and their families into the host school and community. As well, the course facilitates school staff members' understanding of multi-cultural and multi-language learners' needs and support strategies so as to maximize the educational experience. Participants in this course will undertake a comparative approach to similarities and differences between the US culture and other cultures with the goal of developing cultural understanding and sensitivity of ELL/ESL students and families living in the US culture.

  • EDU 434 - Instructional Methodology for English Learners *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate
    • Prerequisites: COE students only

    This course is for English as a Second Language (ESL) practitioners in partial requirement for the Pennsylvania Program Specialist ESL Certificate. This course offers research-based information relative to the design and implementation of an ESL program; methods, strategies, and resources for ESL programs; the use of computer technology (hardware and software) for ELLs; the use of audio/visual media for ELLs; the adaptation of instructional strategies and materials to address the specific needs, talents and interests of ELLs; the integration of multicultural information for ELLs through various curricula; the development, implementation, and evaluation of varied curricular and instructional activities for diverse ELLs; metacognitive awareness and strategic planning of ELLs to assist them in regular classrooms; and the acculturation process regarding reading, writing, speaking, listening, and culture.

  • EDU 435 - Language Acquisition and English Linguistics *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate
    • Prerequisites: COE students only

    This course is for English as a Second Language (ESL) practitioners in pa1tial requirement for the Pennsylvania Program Specialist-ESL Certificate. This course offers an overview of the basic mechanisms of human language, as well as first and second language acquisition and literacy development. Students will examine the linguistic elements of American English and discover effective methods of instruction and assessment of spoken and written language for use with ESL learners. This course is for English as a Second Language (ESL) practitioners in partial requirement for the Pennsylvania Program Specialist-ESL Certificate. This course offers an overview of the basic mechanisms of human language, as well as first and second language acquisition and literacy development. Students will examine the linguistic elements of American English and discover effective method s of instruction and assessment of spoken and written language for use with ESL learners.

  • EDU 436 - Assessment of English Learners *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate

    This course examines the different types and purposes of assessment and the various assessment issues that affect English language learners (i.e. accountability, bias). Students will learn about a variety of performance-based assessments as well as appropriate modifications and accommodations to traditional classroom and standardized assessments in order to measure English language learners' content knowledge independent of their language proficiency. This course will also prepare students to administer standards-based language proficiency assessments and to use the results of these assessments to determine the entry, placement, and instruction of English language learners, as well as to demonstrate students' progress toward and attainment of English language proficiency. This course is designed to meet the requirements for the Pennsylvania English as a Second Language Program Specialist certification program and the TESOL/CAEP Standards for P-12 Teacher Education Programs.

  • EDU 437 - Protocols and Practices for PA ESL Programs *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate

    This course examines the history of bilingual and English as a Second Language (ESL) instruction in the United States and the impact of educational policy on the education of English language learners (ELLs). This course will also prepare students to build collaborative relationships with colleagues who are responsible for general and content-area instruction of ELLs and to serve as advocates for ELLs and their families. This course is designed to meet the requirements for the Pennsylvania English as a Second Language Program Specialist certification program and the TESOL/CAEP Standards for P-12 Teacher Education Programs.

  • EDU 496 - Multicultural Education *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate
    • Prerequisites: COE students only


    This course is designed to help pre-service and in-service teachers and other education professionals to design and implement effective teaching strategies that reflect diversity, and to derive sound guidelines for multi-cultural programs and practices. The life realities, needs, and aspirations of culturally different children and youth are analyzed. Sources of content will be scholarly writings, field investigations, and community resources in foreign countries or American subcultures. Students will be participant observers conducting ethnographic qualitative research in cultural settings different from the mainstream American macro-culture.

Graduate Only

  • EDU 500 - Methods of Research
    • 3 credits, graduate

    This course is a general introduction to the rationale and procedures for educational research. Types of research, selection of a research problem, the use of the library, manual and computerized search strategies, collection and application of data, and the research report will be explored. This is background for the preparation of the thesis or the research project.

  • EDU 526 - Data Driven Decision Making
    • 3 credits, graduate

    With the current emphasis on accountability and data-driven instruction, this course will provide in-service teachers the opportunity to study an area of personal relevance to their classroom and school/institution. It will emphasize the critical role of assessment in the instructional process and the importance of using valid assessments to guide and influence instruction. In keeping with Kutztown’s model of “teacher as lifelong learner,” the course is structured to provide pedagogical foundations, demonstrate various strategies, and examine exemplary materials for use in professional teaching and classroom implementation.

  • EDU 527 - Foundations of Urban Education
    • 3 credits, graduate

    Urban schools are complex social, historical and political constructs. Historically, there have been many attempts to create, reform, eliminate, restructure and reassess urban schools. These efforts to shape urban schools reflect broader efforts to shape American society, in general, and American schools particularly. Some of the profound effects on urban schools reflect decisions that on the surface were not about education at all but about immigration, housing, zooming, health concerns, global competition, social justice initiatives and constitutional interpretation. At a deeper level these initiatives have had a profound effect on urban schooling. As a means of exploring urban schools, we will utilize a single question throughout this course: How do urban schools mirror the search for equity among all people in the United States? Utilizing this question, we will explore equality in attendance, school funding, pedagogy including tracking and de-tracking initiatives, assessment including the standardized test movement, curriculum with an emphasis on the Common Core Standards, classroom management and family involvement. The course will introduce the students to the historical, sociological, economic, and political background that has led to today’s urban schools so that the student can participate as a teacher leader in urban education.

  • EDU 528 - Student Diversity and Critical Pedagogy
    • 3 credits, graduate
    • Prerequisites: Students that have taken EDU/MLS 428 Cultural Awareness ESL/ELL cannot take EDU 528.


    This course is designed to help preservice and in-service educators and others in the education enterprise to clarify the philosophical and definitional issues related to pluralistic teaching strategies that reflect diversity, and to derive sound guidelines for multicultural/multilingual programs and practices. The life realities, needs, and aspirations of linguistically and culturally different children and youth are analyzed. Critical theory and more specifically strategies and approaches for facilitating a critical literacy in students will be emphasized in this course. Participants in this course will undertake a comparative approach to similarities and differences between U. S. culture and other cultures with the goal of developing cultural understanding and sensitivity of diverse students and families living in the United States.

  • EDU 532 - Education Exploration
    • 3 credits, graduate

    Education Exploration is intended to provide teacher candidates with an introduction to the complexities of today’s classrooms and education environment. Knowledge will be gained through observation and attendance at various education-related events and direct participation in classroom activities. In keeping with Kutztown’s model of “teacher as a lifelong learner,” the course is structured to provide as many opportunities as possible to inform and educate them on the complex competencies and responsibilities of the role of the classroom teacher and schools.

  • EDU 533 - Social Interpretations of Education
    • 3 credits, graduate

    This course examines basic social concepts and institutions. Their development is traced and their effects upon educational policies and practices are investigated.

  • EDU 535 - Major Philosophies of Education
    • 3 credits, graduate

    Theorists such as Pierce, James, Montessori, Dewey, Bagley, Whitehead, Kilpatrick, and Brameld are studied for their bearing on contemporary educational philosophy. Evaluation of diverse current views is also presented.

  • EDU 541 - Supervision and Finance
    • 3 credits, graduate

    This course is designed to provide educational personnel with a theoretical and practical understanding of the various models and approaches to the supervision of instruction. Staff development as a supervisory process will be a major focus.

  • EDU 562 - School Law
    • 3 credits, graduate

    This course will focus on the sources of law under which educational policy is developed and implemented, analyze basic legal concepts, interpret topics which have a direct impact on educators and students and reflect on the law and the responsibilities that accompany legal rights.

  • EDU 564 - Foundation of the Middle Level Learner
    • 3 credits, graduate

    The past two decades have witnessed tremendous reform in middle level education and more restructuring is in progress. This course examines the physical, emotional, intellectual, and moral development of the middle level learner and the corresponding implications for school organization. This is an integrated course with the Department of Secondary Education, the Department of Human Kinetics, and the Department of Counseling and Human Services working together to provide an integrated look at the middle level learner in the school setting. The Human Kinetics Department would be responsible for physical concerns. The Counseling Department would be responsible for concerns dealing with social, emotional and moral growth, and the Secondary Education Department would work toward an understanding of the cognitive growth of the middle level student. The departments would work together to promote the understanding of how the current research on middle level learners applies to the middle level practitioner. The course would utilize both team and individual teaching. It would also model the teaming process which is the primary teaching organizational practice used in middle schools.

  • EDU 568 - Middle Level Curriculum and Instruction
    • 3 credits, graduate

    The past two decades have witnessed tremendous reform in middle level education and more restructuring is in progress. Middle school educators have been driven by one premise: everything that is done for and with students in a school should be based on what we know about the nature and needs of the age group. This course explores the unique sociological and psychological aspects of the middle level learner and the implications of these aspects for teachers, counselors, and administrators in the organization of the middle school and in development of a responsive curriculum for middle level learners.

  • EDU 592 - Intensive Clinical Experience
    • 6 credits, graduate
    • Prerequisites: All courses in Areas I and II of the Master of Education degree: Secondary Education - Teaching  EDU 434; and EDU 533 or 535 or 562 or 597; and EDU 564 or 568; and SPU 500 and 514; and SEU 520 and 535 and 540; and EDU 526

    A field assignment in a middle or high school setting will provide the clinical student teaching experience. Teacher candidates will teach under a mentor in the schools and meet weekly with their university supervisor in a fieldwork seminar. Content includes dealing with classroom issues, developing planning skills, organizing the classroom for instruction, seeking professional employment, developing classroom management skills, and relating previously learned material to the day-to-day teaching experience. Teacher candidates prepare for making the transition from graduate student to professional teacher. The field experience provides an opportunity for candidates to synthesize their graduate learning experience.
    In addition, teacher candidates will be required to maintain and electronic reflective journal/portfolio using guidelines created by the individual discipline supervisor. There will also be a research and writing requirement assigned by the professor.

SEU Courses

Courses denoted with an asterisk (*) are available to Undergraduate & Graduate students.

  • SEU 312WICD - Principles of Learning
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate
    • Prerequisites: EDU 100, Candidacy

    This is a clinically-based course that examines how aspects of learner language, culture, prior knowledge and experience influence the learning process in the school setting. This course will provide a bridge between theories of learning and current practice by placing teaching candidates in a weekly, supervised experience. This course will be taken after the student has achieved teacher candidacy. Teaching candidates will meet for 6 hours each week, in two three-hour blocks. During the first block, candidates will meet at the university with the professor. This will be the theory-based component of the course and coordinates with Categories I and IV of the Principles of Teaching and Learning criteria established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The second block will take place in the school setting (SEU 313 Principles of Learning Clinical Lab). This course must be taken with SEU 313 Principles of Learning Clinical Lab. This course is a prerequisite for SEU 342 Principles of Teaching.

  • SEU 313 - Principles of Learning Clinical Lab
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate
    • Prerequisites: COE students with Candidacy only

    This is the clinical part (second block) of the SEU 312 Principles of Learning course. The entire class will be assigned to a school where pairs of teaching candidates will be assigned to a classroom. Schools will be recruited based on their opportunities for diverse experiences and size. The Kutztown faculty member will accompany teaching candidates to the placement and will supervise while the candidates are in the building. This course must be taken with SEU 312 Principles of Learning. It is a prerequisite for SEU 342 Principles of Teaching.

  • SEU 342WIVL - Principles of Teaching
    • 3 credits, undergraduate
    • Prerequisites: SEU 312, Candidacy

    This is a clinically based course that provides teaching candidates with a common language to talk about teaching and clear, concrete levels of performance for teaching candidates to use in reflecting upon the work of the classroom teacher. These components of professional practice are based on Praxis III and are aligned with INTASC and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. This course will provide a bridge between theories of teaching and current practice by place teaching candidates in a weekly, supervised experience. This course must be taken with SEU 343 Principles of Teaching Clinical Lab.

  • SEU 343 - Principles of Teaching Clinical Lab
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate
    • Prerequisites: COE students with Candidacy only

    This clinical experience meets the PDE requirements to extend field experiences prior to the student teaching assignment. Teacher candidates will be assigned to a high school in their certification area. This course must be taken with SEU 342 Principles of Teaching.

  • SEU 390 - Clinical Experience and Practicum: Secondary I
    • 6 credits, Undergraduate
    • Prerequisites: COE students with Candidacy only

    Both SEU 390 & SEU 391 are segments of a single course which provides two full-time classroom experiences comprising an entire semester. Opportunities are provided for observation and participation in all activities related to teaching on the secondary level. The practicum, concurrent with student teaching, is a clearing house for the selection, organization, and presentation of proposed units, lessons, or activities. In addition, it provides an opportunity for the discussion of problems that arise in the classroom. Students organize units of instruction and present them for evaluation by the group. Juniors are encouraged wherever feasible to participate in the practicum.

  • SEU 391 - Clinical Experience and Practicum: Secondary II
    • 6 credits, Undergraduate
    • Prerequisites: COE students with Candidacy only

    Both SEU 390 & SEU 391 are segments of a single course which provides two full-time classroom experiences comprising an entire semester. Opportunities are provided for observation and participation in all activities related to teaching on the secondary level. The practicum, concurrent with student teaching, is a clearing house for the selection, organization, and presentation of proposed units, lessons, or activities. In addition, it provides an opportunity for the discussion of problems that arise in the classroom. Students organize units of instruction and present them for evaluation by the group. Juniors are encouraged wherever feasible to participate in the practicum.

  • SEU 410WI - Science Instructional Methods for Middle & HS *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate
    • Undergraduate Prerequisites: SEU 342, Candidacy or permission of instructor
    • Graduate Prerequisites: COE students only

    This course is a graduate level instructional methodology course designed to meet the needs of the graduate and post-baccalaureate student seeking certification in middle level and high school level science. It is a comprehensive science methodology course for students in the College of Education. The basic philosophy of this course is to adapt constructivist methodology to science education. The infusion of Internet technology coupled with the National and Pennsylvania Standards in Science Education will call upon students to formulate instructional strategies that are both relevant and grade level appropriate. This graduate course will meet PA State CETP guidelines.

  • SEU 420 - Education Theory and Practice *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate


    This course is designed for post-baccalaureate teaching candidates who have already passed the Praxis II in their content area. This course will provide the preservice middle and high school teachers with strategies necessary to promote effective, creative, and scholarly middle and high school instruction. Major emphasis will be placed on providing the necessary background to develop courses, instructional units, and lessons. Instructional activities will be aimed at promoting the subject literacy of their students. Teaching candidates will gain insights into methods of effective communication and interaction with students, utilization of technology for laboratory research and reference, and methods of evaluating student achievement. Process skills as well as content will be strongly emphasized.

  • SEU 422 - World Language Instructional Methods for Middle and High School *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate
    • Undergraduate prerequisites: SEU 342, Candidacy or permission of instructor

    This course is an undergraduate and graduate level instructional methodology
    course designed to meet the needs of teacher candidates in the undergraduate
    Secondary Education program and Secondary Education Master's program seeking certification in K-12 Spanish and German. This course focuses on the theories, methods, techniques, strategies, materials, technology, and assessment procedures that align with the standards put forth by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Students will learn how to plan effective lessons and thematic units, implementing the national standards for world language instruction for planning, instruction and assessment. The teacher candidates will also adhere to the ACTFL recommendation that lessons are taught in the target language. In addition to completing written assignments, students will teach sample lessons to their peers and perform twenty hours of observation in the field.

  • SEU 425 - English Instructional Methods for Middle and High School *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate
    • Undergraduate Prerequisites: SEU 342, Candidacy or permission of instructor
    • Graduate Prerequisites: COE students only


    This is an undergraduate and graduate instructional methodology course designed to meet the needs of teacher candidates in the undergraduate Secondary Education program and the Secondary Education Masters program seeking certification in Grades 7-12 English. This course focuses on the theories, methods, strategies, materials, and assessment procedures for effective teaching and learning in a secondary English classroom and that align with the standards put forth by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). In this course, student experiences include classroom observation, microteaching, films, lectures, and construction of lesson plans and an instructional unit. Teacher candidates will learn how to plan lessons using the PDE-SAS lesson plan template and develop instructional units, implementing NCTE's standards for effective instruction and assessment. In addition, teacher candidates will teach sample lessons and complete 20 hours of field experiences. This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates with the strategies and instructional tools necessary to teach in middle school and high school English classroom settings during their student teaching (clinical) experience.

  • SEU 426 - Social Studies Methods for Middle and High School *
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate & Graduate
    • Graduate Prerequisites: SEU 342, Candidacy or permission of instructor

    Social studies tends to be misinterpreted as fact-based history, rote memorization of state capitols, and balancing budgets. The reality is that social studies can be a valuable tool in encouraging children to become active participants in our society. According to the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), the leading national organization for social studies education, "the purpose of social studies is to enable students to understand, participate in, and make infom1ed decisions about their world." With this in mind, this course is an undergraduate and graduate instructional methodology course designed to meet the needs of teacher candidates in undergraduate Secondary Education program and Secondary Education Masters program seeking certification in Grades 7-12 Social Studies. This course explores the theories, methods, strategies, materials, and assessment procedures for effective teaching and learning in a secondary social studies classroom and that align with the standards put forth by the NCSS.
    This course is designed to provide preservice teachers in social studies with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to powerfully teach social studies at the secondary level. While social studies content is embedded in our discussions of classroom instruction, this course is structured to provide students with opportunities to apply theory, resources, and methods to social studies teaching and learning in the middle and high schools through micro-teaching, planning and media analysis tasks. We explore a myriad of topics and issues related to social studies content, pedagogy, and assessment, and offer students specific opportunities to lead these conversations during the semester. Much of our work together highlights the competing goals of social studies education, the relationship among teaching, learning and assessment, and constructing classrooms that reflect democratic ideals. In addition, there will be a strong emphasis on practical aspects of classroom instruction, such as synthesizing content into unit and individual lesson plans, working with state and national standards, and using a wide variety of strategies to relay content.

  • SEU 430WI - Mathematics Instructional Methods For Middle and High School
    • 3 credits, Undergraduate
    • Prerequisites: SEU 342, Candidacy or permission of instructor

    This course is a graduate level instructional methodology course designed to meet the needs of the graduate and post-baccalaureate student seeking certification in middle level and high school level science. It is a comprehensive science methodology course for students in the College of Education. The basic philosophy of this course is to adapt constructivist methodology to science education. The infusion of Internet technology coupled with the National and Pennsylvania Standards in Science Education will call upon students to formulate instructional strategies that are both relevant and grade level appropriate. This graduate course will meet PA State CETP guidelines.

Graduate Only

  • SEU 535 - Classroom Management for the Inclusive Classroom
    • 3 credits, graduate

    This course will prepare teachers to be educational leaders who effectively manage their classrooms. It will focus on taking a proactive approach to create a positive learning environment for all students. The course will operate from a perspective that it is the teacher’s responsibility to bring an enhanced level of professionalism and strong sense of ethical behavior to the classroom. Special attention will be given to the recognition that today’s classrooms are inclusive and contain students with a variety of needs and learning styles that need to be accommodated. A successful learning environment requires effective lesson plans and appropriate communication with students, parents, administrative and community resources.

  • SEU 540 - Reading, Writing, and Critical Thinking in a Standards Aligned System
    • 3 credits, graduate

    This graduate course will focus on the literacy needs of adolescent and young adult learners. Formal and informal techniques and strategies which promote information acquisition, expression, and critical thinking in content areas will be at the essence of this course. Students will learn reading and writing activities suitable to all content area course offerings. Additionally, strategies which promote problem solving and critical thinking will be included in this course. Students taking the minimum number of credits in Areas I-IV in the Masters of Education Programs will have 3 credits remaining to be completed as a free elective. These 3 credits may be satisfied by taking an additional graduate level course. This course would fall into this category. This course can be taken as an elective in Area IV of the Master's Degree in Secondary Education - Curriculum and Instruction

  • SEU 544 - Action Research for Teacher Leaders
    • 3 credits, graduate

    This seminar is designed for practicing teachers and others who are involved in instructional activity. The state-of-the-art in instructional theory will be investigated. Consideration will be given to the factors related to effective teaching, teacher credibility, and the planning and implementation of a feedback system

  • SEU 567 - Curriculum in a Standards-Aligned System
    • 3 credits, graduate


    The course emphasizes critical appraisal of existing curriculum theory and practice in American secondary schools. Identification and evaluation of current trends will be discussed. Students will investigate historical, global, and political influences the secondary education level curriculum of today and the future with particular emphasis on the Standard Aligned System and the Common core Curriculum.