Honors Program Courses

The courses listed below will be offered by the Kutztown University Honors Program for the fall 2020 Semester!

First-Year Seminar

FYS 100 2319 (3388) First-Year Seminar

Muzeta | TH | 12:00-1:20 | BK 218

The First-Year Seminar prepares students for the kind of academic work expected in college. In a small ­class setting, students work closely with their professors and peers to explore a particular topic in-depth and develop skills that are essential for success at the university. Skills include those in substantive reading, critical thinking, writing, speaking, ethical analysis and reasoning, active and collaborative learning, academic research, and the use of technology. Students also learn how to use university resources, including student support services, in their academic pursuits. The specific topic of the seminar varies with the academic passion and expertise of the instructor. Topics are accessible to all students with no prerequisites.

 

Honors Only Courses:

BIO 104 019H (2590) Principles of Biology

Heineman | T | 8:00-10:50 | BH 202

This course provides students with an introduction to the biological principles and functional aspects of biology that will serve as a foundation for understanding the biology of plants and animals. The concepts covered in this course include the scientific method, cellular structures and processes, genetics, evolution, and biodiversity. This class meets for three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

 

CMP 100 019H (1549) Effective Composition

Leonard | MWF | 9:00-9:50 | LY 114

Students in CMP 100 examine and practice writing in public and academic contexts. The course focuses on writing processes and provides sustained practice in critical thinking, reading, and writing demanded by academic and public writing. Student writing and student writers are at the center of the class. Assignments challenge students to expand their approaches to revision and to experiment with a wide variety of writer's techniques. Particular attention is paid to the intersections of audience, purpose, genre, and context. That is, you will consider not only what to write, but also to whom and in what forms. You will also examine the influences that the writer's and audience's circumstances can exert on composition. The conventions of writing, which may include diction, grammar, syntax, usage, and structure, are addressed as part of the process of writing, and students may study how these conventions change with context.
CMP 100 fulfills the General Education requirement for a 100-level CMP course.

 

CMP 200 079H (1587) Research and Composition

Lynch-Biniek | MW | 3:00-4:20 | LY 136

Students in CMP 200 practice research and research writing. Assignments challenge you to revise you work and to experiment with a variety of writer's tools as you put your own voice and perspectives into conversation with those of other writers and thinkers. The course focuses on: the development of research questions; the uses of library databases, the library, and digital resources to find information and perspectives; and writing with research. Particular attention is paid to developing intellectual curiosity, assessing sources' credibility, reading academic work and studies, and practicing ethical attribution and citation. Student writers are at the center of the class. CMP:200 fulfills the General Education requirement for a 200-level CMP course.

 

CMP 200 099H (1573) Research and Composition

Lynch-Biniek | TH | 9:30-10:50 | LY 136

Students in CMP 200 practice research and research writing. Assignments challenge you to revise you work and to experiment with a variety of writer's tools as you put your own voice and perspectives into conversation with those of other writers and thinkers. The course focuses on: the development of research questions; the uses of library databases, the library, and digital resources to find information and perspectives; and writing with research. Particular attention is paid to developing intellectual curiosity, assessing sources' credibility, reading academic work and studies, and practicing ethical attribution and citation. Student writers are at the center of the class. CMP:200 fulfills the General Education requirement for a 200-level CMP course.

 

COM 10 019H (3085) Fundamentals of Oral Communication

Ironside | MWF | 12:00-12:50 | LC 113C

The course introduces the theory and practice of oral communication in presentational, interpersonal, and group contexts. Students develop knowledge of, appreciation for, and the requisite skills to communicate effectively in our culturally and professionally diverse world. Students will learn to develop, organize, and prepare messages, as well as apply active and critical listening skills. This course also prepares students to understand the role of perception, ethics, beliefs, attitudes, nonverbal signals, and stereotypical language in oral communication.

 

GEG 20 029H (2953) Elements of Cultural Geography

Snell | TH | 3:00-4:20 | BH 105

The purpose of this course is to teach students how to think geographically about culture. This involves considering how people’s actions through social, economic, and political processes create and transform places. Topics include, but are not limited to, geographies of population, migration, language, religion, ethnicity, politics, urbanization, agriculture, and development. Students will study how peoples’ culture affects the world around them, and in turn, how it is affected by the cultures and environments that surround it.

 

HIS 241 019H (3331) History of Women in America

Kelleher | TH | 9:30-10:50 | LY 109

This course is a study of woman's role in American life tracing her effect on the nation's history.

 

MKT 210 019H (1172) Principles of Marketing

Maskulka | TH | 9:30-10:50 | DF 202

Principles of Marketing is a broad study of the field of marketing as seen from a managerial perspective. Emphasis is on demand analysis, customer need satisfaction, product planning and development, distribution selection, promotional decision making, price determination and social responsibility. This course is not to be taken until students have completed 24 credits and (CMP 100 or ENG 23 or ENG 24 or ENG 25).

 

PSY 11 019H (2195) General Psychology

Lanter | MW | 3:00-4:20 | OM 22B

An introduction to the psychological bases of behavior in motivation, learning, memory, development, personality, perception, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, attitude change, and group behavior.

 

ENG 108 019H (3121) Poetry and Poetics

Vogel | MW | 3:00-4:20 | LY 206

Poetry is among the most fundamental human activities. From our most distant origins all the way down to the present day, from landmark occasions to our daily lives, people sing, pray, protest, aspire, love, and grieve in verse. This course engages these traditions by studying poems old and new to illustrate the traditions and aesthetic theories of the art. It is writing­ intensive, galvanizing skills in analysis, interpretation, research, and critical writing; therefore, it meets General Education requirements for category A4.

 

The sections below are DUAL ENROLLMENT COURSES that include Honors Students and Traditional Students:

If you are selecting a dual enrollment course, please select the Honors section (019).

 

CSC 135 049H (1382) + CSC 135 040 (1368) Computer Science I

Earl | TH | 12:00-1:20 | GR 307

*Students wanting to enroll in this course must email frye@kutztown.edu with their name, student ID#, and class information to be added. Do this AFTER you enroll in your other classes for Fall 2020. This course is NOT visible on MyKU.*

An introduction to computer components; algorithmic design and the constructs of structured programming; elementary data types and data operations; programming in a high level language; one-and-two dimensional arrays; subroutines and top-down, modular, step-wise programming; computer solution of several numerical and non-numerical problems.

 

CSC 150 039H (3035) + CSC 150 030 (3407) Ethical, Legal, & Professional Impacts of Digital Age

Tranotti | TH | 8:00-9:20 | GR 307

This course covers ethical, legal, and professional issues germane to the computer science and information technology disciplines. Students will acquire foundational knowledge sufficient to identify significant current issues that can arise for a professional in our discipline and also an ability to identify potential effects resulting from advances in digital technology. Key topics that will be covered encompass ethical, moral, and legal aspects of digital technology. The impacts of these topics on personal, social, political, and educational environments will be discussed and debated. Theoretical and practical sides of issues will be included.

 

CSC 354 029H (1389) + CSC 354 020 (1361) WI Software Engineering I

Hussain | TH | 12:00-1:20 | OM 159

This is the first course in a two semester capstone sequence. This course introduces the fundamental principles of software engineering. Coverage will include the System Development Lifecycle (SDLC) methodologies, capturing requirements, design modeling, project management, risk management, and quality assurance. Students will learn techniques for requirements elicitation, prioritization, validation, and specification.
They will be introduced to various design models that are used to capture requirements.

 

CSC 355 019H (3408) + CSC 355 010 (1364) WI Software Engineering II

Demarco | MWF | 8:00-8:50 | GR 307

This is the second course in a two semester capstone sequence. This course presents the advanced principles of software engineering. Coverage will include the professional responsibilities of the software engineer, implementation, testing, configuration management, and the project management. Students will be introduced to different development and testing approaches.

 

MUS 108 019H (3188) + MUS 108 010 (3187) CD Introduction to World Music

Rober | TH | 9:30-10:50 | SA 5G

This course is a survey of music focusing on non-Western cultures. Selected musical traditions from throughout the world will be explored, with emphasis on how music functions as part of the daily life in particular societies. Through lecture, discussion, and direct listening, students will become more familiar with other cultures, values, and traditions and gain a better aesthetic appreciation of music from diverse societies.

 

The section below must be signed up for in the Communication Design office:

 

CDE 130 019H (1209) + CDE 130 020 (1189) Typography CPVL

TBA | MW | 12:00-2:50 | SH 213

A study of the principles of designing with type, including type history, and technological advancements. There is special emphasis on type selection, specification, and creative typographic design solutions. A minimum of 3 hours of work outside of class is required per week.

 

CDE 220 019H (3220) + CDE 220 010 (3174) 1st Half - 

& CDE 220 029H (3462) + CDE 220 016 (3463) 2nd Half -  Print Media Production

Meloney | MWF | 10:00-11:50 | SH212

A course in the study of print media reproduction processes to facilitate effective preparation of art for the various contemporary printing methods.

 

The section below is for MUSIC MAJORS only:

 

MUU 320 019H (3185) + MUU 320 010 (3184) Instrumental Music Methods

Neuenschwander | MWF | 11:00-11:50 | SA 114

This course is designed to prepare students to teach instrumental music in the schools. Each student will be able to discuss and/or demonstrate appropriate teaching techniques, strategies and materials (including representative orchestral and wind repertoire), and develop an understanding of the administrative responsibilities needed to initiate and maintain a successful instrumental music program.

 

The section below is by INVITATION ONLY:

 

FIN 375 319H (1125) Appl. Investment Mgmt., CTWI

TBA | T | 6:00-8:50 | DF 213

A small group of students, guided by a faculty member, work as a committee to manage a portfolio of stocks and bonds with the goal of matching or achieving above average, risk­adjusted returns relative to a benchmark. The students apply research, financial analysis, and portfolio management principles and tools to the management of a balanced portfolio (i.e., a portfolio containing both equities and fixed-income securities).