College of Education - Learning Outcomes

  • Teacher Certification Programs

    All initial teacher certification programs use the ten InTASC standards (required by CAEP accreditation) as their Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs). The ten InTASC standards are organized in 4 domains (The Learner and Learning, Content Knowledge, Instructional Practice, and Professional Responsibility).

    1. Learner Development - The teacher candidate will understand how learners grow and develop, recognizing that patterns of learning and development vary individually within and across the cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical areas, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
    2. Learning Differences - The teacher candidate will be able to use understandings of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
    3. Learning Environments - The teacher candidate will be able to work with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
    4. Content Knowledge - The teacher candidate will be able to understand the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.
    5. Application of Content - The teacher candidate will be able to understand how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.
    6. Assessment - The teacher candidate will be able to understand and use multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher candidate's and learner's decision making.
    7. Planning for Instruction - The teacher candidate will be able to plan instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals by drawing upon knowledge of content areas, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, and pedagogy, as well as knowledge of learners and the community context.
    8. Instructional Strategies - The teacher candidate will be able to understand and use a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.
    9. Professional Learning and Ethical Practice - The teacher candidate will be able to engage in ongoing professional learning and use evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to meet the needs of each learner.
    10. Leadership and Collaboration - The teacher candidate will be able to seek appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.
  • MED in Secondary Education Curriculum and Instruction Non-Certification
    1. Knowledge Development: The candidate will be able to demonstrate an understanding of how knowledge is gained, how to verify knowledge, and how to judge its value.
    2. Instruction: the candidate will be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of instructional strategies that enhance instruction.
    3. Education Environment: The candidate will be able to explore the fundamentals underlying the education process and related them to current practice in schooling.
    4. Diversity and Equity: The candidate will be able to display an awareness of diversity as it relates to classroom curriculum, management and assessment.
    5. Decision Making: The candidate will be able to investigate the criteria for decision making and the structure and organization of curriculum and instruction.
    6. Professional Learning: The candidate will be able to engage in ongoing professional learning and use evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners, families, other professionals, and the community), and adapt practice to meet the needs of each learner.
  • MED in Reading
    1. Foundational Knowledge: Candidates demonstrate knowledge of the theoretical, historical, and evidence-based foundations of literacy and language and the ways in which they interrelate and the role of literacy professionals in schools.
    2. Curriculum and Instruction: Candidates use foundational knowledge to critique and implement literacy curricula to meet the needs of all learners and to design, implement, and evaluate evidence-based literacy instruction for all learners.
    3. Assessment and Evaluation: Candidates understand, select, and use valid, reliable, fair, and appropriate assessment tools to screen, diagnose, and measure student literacy achievement; inform instruction and evaluate interventions; participate in professional learning experiences; explain assessment results and advocate for appropriate literacy practices to relevant stakeholders.
    4. Diversity and Equity: Candidates demonstrate knowledge of research, relevant theories, pedagogies, essential concepts of diversity and equity; demonstrate and provide opportunities for understanding all forms of diversity as central to students' identities; create classrooms and schools that are inclusive and affirming; advocate for equity at school, district, and community levels.
    5. Learners and the Literacy Environment: Candidates meet the developmental needs of all learners and collaborate with school personnel to use a variety of print and digital materials to engage and motivate all learners; integrate digital technologies in appropriate, safe, and effective ways; foster a positive climate that supports a literacy-rich learning environment.
    6. Professional Learning and Leadership: Candidates recognize the importance of, participate in, and facilitate ongoing professional learning as part of career-long leadership roles and responsibilities.
    7. Practicum/Clinical Experiences (for specialized literacy professionals only): Candidates apply theory and best practice in multiple supervised practicum/clinical experiences.
  • EDD
    1. Cultural Competency (A): The Learning Associate will be able to critically reflect on student populations to purposefully create practices that meet the needs of all learners.
    2. Cultural Competency (B): The Learning Associate will be able to employ transformative practices when responding to social justice initiatives in their educational setting.
    3. Cultural Competency (C): The Learning Associate will be able to engage stakeholders within the educational setting and community make systemic curricular decisions surrounding multiculturalism and social justice.
    4. Research Methods & Methodology: The Learning Associate will be able to engage in and promote lines of inquiry that result in meaningful analysis, conclusions and recommendations for student and education-specific puzzles of practice.
    5. Systems Thinking: The Learning Associate will be able to develop a shared vision and commitment to high student achievement and foster collaboration and inquiry.
    6. Accountability for Equitable Student Performance: The Learning Associate will be able to effectively interpret data that supports the implementation of transformative curriculum and practices to foster accountable educational cultures that reflect high expectations.
    7. Applied Research: The Learning Associate will be able to analyze the systematic collection, review, dissemination, and use data in making data-driven decisions to bring about transformative change.
    8. Reflective Practice: The Learning Associate will be able to recognize transformative qualities through self-analysis, inquiry, and personal reflection to become effective change agents in their education setting.
  • BS/BSED in Library Science
    1. Students will become discriminating consumers and skilled creators of information and media.
    2. Students will become collaborative leaders who engage in ethical practices in the use of informational and instructional technologies.
    3. Students will demonstrate the ability to provide effective resources and activities that contribute to their own patrons' lifelong learning, while accommodating a wide range or differences in learning styles, interests, and capacities.
    4. Students will demonstrate the ability to provide resources and learning activities that represent a diversity of experiences, opinions, social and cultural perspectives, supporting the concept that intellectual freedom and access to information are prerequisites to effective and responsible citizenship in a democracy. 
  • MLS in Library Science
    1. Students will research and synthesize professional resources to make critical recommendations regarding the curation of resources and development of information and media. 
    2. Students will be collaborative leaders who engage in ethical practices and research and analysis in the use of informational and instructional technologies. 
    3. Students will research, evaluate and recommend effective resources and activities that contribute to their own patrons' lifelong learning while accommodating a wide range or differences in learning styles, interests, and capacities.
    4. Students will research, evaluate and recommend resources and learning activities that represent a diversity of experiences, opinions, social and cultural perspectives, supporting the concept that intellectual freedom and access to information are prerequisites to effective and responsible citizenship in a democracy.
  • MED in Instructional Technology
    1. Candidates inspire and participate in the development and implementation of a shared vision for the comprehensive integration of technology to promote excellence and support transformational change throughout the instructional environment.
    2. Candidates conduct needs assessments, develop technology-related professional learning programs, and evaluate the impact on instructional practice and student learning.
    3. Candidates create and support effective digital age learning environments to maximize the learning of all students and promote digital citizenship.
    4. Candidates demonstrate professional knowledge, skills, and dispositions in content, pedagogical, and technological areas, as well as adult learning and leadership and, are continuously deepening their knowledge and expertise.
    5. Candidates assist teachers in using technology effectively for assessing student learning, differentiating instruction, and providing rigorous, relevant, and engaging learning experiences for all students.
  • Educational Studies
    1. All students will demonstrate content knowledge about individuals with disabilities.
    2. All students will collaborate with all team members, including family members.
    3. All students will assist in the administration of the organization.
    4. All students will utilize culturally responsive strategies that promote effective communication and collaboration with students with disabilities, families, school and agency personnel and community members.
    5. All students will develop work competencies and professional attitudes for a specific profession or occupation. 
  • Educational Studies (VI)
    1. All students will demonstrate content knowledge about individuals with disabilities.
    2. All students will collaborate with all team members, including family members.
    3. All students will assist in the administration of the organization.
    4. All students will utilize culturally responsive strategies that promote effective communication and collaboration with students with disabilities, families, school and agency personnel and community members.
    5. All students will develop work competencies and professional attitudes for a specific profession or occupation. 
  • MA/MS in Counseling Programs
    1. Demonstrates content knowledge in the CACREP core area of Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice.
    2. Demonstrates content knowledge in the CACREP core area of Social and Cultural Diversity.
    3. Demonstrates content knowledge in the CACREP core area of Human Growth and Development.
    4. Demonstrates content knowledge in the CACREP core area of Career Development.
    5. Demonstrates content knowledge in the CACREP core area of Helping Relationships.
    6. Demonstrates content knowledge in the CACREP core area of Group Work.
    7. Demonstrates content knowledge in the CACREP core area of Assessment.
    8. Demonstrates content knowledge in the CACREP core area of Research and Program Evaluation.
    9. Demonstrates the ability to competently provide the services and meet the responsibilities of a professional counselor.
  • Student Affairs in Higher Education Graduate Program Learning Outcomes
    1. Personal and Ethical Foundations: Students will demonstrate, consistent with ACPA, NASPA, and CAS objectives, awareness and understanding of one's values and beliefs as related to professional codes of ethics and principles of personal wellness.
    2. Values, Philosophy, and History: Students will demonstrate, consistent with ACPA, NASPA, and CAS objectives, a basic understanding of the values, philosophy and history of the student affairs profession as relevant to professional practice in the field.
    3. Assessment, Evaluation, and Research: Students will demonstrate, consistent with ACPA, NASPA, and CAS objectives, an understanding and ability to design, conduct, critique, and utilize various AER methodologies and the results from them to inform professional practice.
    4. Law, Policy, and Governance: Students will demonstrate, consistent with ACPA, NASPA, and CAS objectives, an understanding of policy development processes used in various contexts; the application of legal constructs, compliance/policy issues; and governance structures and their impact upon professional practice.
    5. Organizational and Human Resources: Students will demonstrate, consistent with ACPA, NASPA, and CAS objectives, an understanding of the scale, scope, and interactivity of the human and organizational resources involved in the professional practice of student affairs within the context of higher education.
    6. Leadership: Students will demonstrate, consistent with ACPA, NASPA, and CAS objectives, a basic understanding of concepts, principles, and dynamics of leadership, leadership processes, and leadership development, both generally and in the context of higher education. This includes understanding processes of student leadership and development.
    7. Social Justice and Inclusion: Students will demonstrate, consistent with ACPA, NASPA, and CAS objectives, awareness, and understanding of issues of oppression, privilege, and power and their manifestations, along with the impact they have upon our personal and professional interactions with those with whom we work, especially college students. Additional focus is placed upon understanding social justice and advocacy-oriented practices and skills.
    8. Student Learning and Development: Students will demonstrate, consistent with ACPA, NASPA, and CAS objectives, a critical understanding of learning and development theories and their use in constructing learning outcomes. This includes the ability to apply theory to improve and inform student affairs and teaching practice.
    9. Technology: Students will demonstrate, consistent with ASPA, NASPA, and CAS objectives, understanding of the use of digital tools, resources, and technologies for the advancement of student learning, development, and success as well as digital literacy necessary for improved professional practice.
    10. Advising and Supporting: Students will demonstrate, consistent with ACPA, NASPA, and CAS objectives, development of capacities for individual interventions that entail listening, direction, feedback, critique, referral, and guidance; understanding of group dynamics; management of conflict and crisis situations; and collaboration with others on and off-campus.

    Note: The American College Personnel Association (ASPA), the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA), and the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) have endorsed the above ten areas as competencies and learning outcomes for graduate preparation programs in student affairs in higher education. Each area has a list of foundational level knowledge, dispositions, and skills that should be addressed in graduate training programs and that students should be prepared to meet by graduation. The curriculum for the Kutztown University Student Affairs in Higher Education Graduate Program includes a course(s) that addresses each competency area.