Course Offerings

Physics Courses

The Physics major blends a set of core courses with choices from a broad range of optional courses, allowing students to tailor their curriculum to their career goals. Specialized instruction on specific topics can be arranged with faculty.

The following courses in Physics are presently available at Kutztown University. PHY 100 and PHY 102 are required of all physics majors and are prerequisites for all higher-level courses in physics.  Additional details on these courses can be found in the course catalog.

  • PHY 14 – Physics of Superheroes

    The course is a one-semester general education physics course that uses the concepts of physics to look at superheroes in comic books and in movies. Physics is the study of how our universe works; these same concepts can also be applied to the fantastical universe of comic book superheroes. Students will learn about various concepts in physics (matter, energy, and force). We will examine gravity, electricity, magnetism, optics, relativity, and quantum physics and see how they apply to the universe of superheroes. Comic books apply actual physics that range from the Kryptonian world of Superman to the superhuman speed of Flash here on Earth. We will explore these fundamental principles of physics and use them to separate fact from fiction in the world of your favorite comic book characters. This course does not count toward the Physics major or minor.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 20 – Introduction to Physics

    This course is an introduction to the principles of physics including mechanics, thermal physics, wave motion, electricity and magnetism, optics, atomic and nuclear physics. The traditional topics will be related to contemporary problems. This is a laboratory course intended for the general education of non-science majors. This course does not satisfy major, concomitant or specialization requirements for Secondary Education and/or Liberal Arts and Science majors.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 2

  • PHY 35 – Physics Guide to Life

    This general education course examines the central concepts of physics by correlating them with patterns of life, human behavior and society. The course is ideas-driven, with no math beyond elementary arithmetic and geometry. A comprehensive picture of physics is conveyed, covering classical physics, quantum mechanics, relativity, elementary particles and statistical mechanics. The course will use analogies from common life experiences to build intuition about physical laws. This course does not satisfy major, concomitant, or specialization requirements for Secondary Education and/or Liberal Arts and Science majors or count toward major GPA for Physics majors.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 40 – General Physics I

    This is the first part of the algebra-based (non-calculus) introductory course sequence in physics. It will cover mechanics, vibrations and waves, and thermal physics. This course does not meet the program requirements of physics and chemistry majors.

    Prerequisites: MAT 106 (Trigonometry) or MAT 115 (Pre-Calculus) or MAT 181 (Calculus I)

    Credits: 4

    Lecture Hours: 3

    Lab Hours: 3

  • PHY 42 – General Physics II

    This is the second part of the algebra-based (non-calculus) introductory course sequence in physics. It will cover electricity and magnetism, and optics. This course does not meet the program requirements of physics and chemistry majors.

    Prerequisites: PHY 40 (General Physics I)

    Credits: 4

    Lecture Hours: 3

    Lab Hours: 3

  • PHY 80 – Problem-Solving Techniques in Applied Science

    This is a support course for Physical Science majors that will provide an overview of mathematical problem-solving skills needed to succeed in physics and other physical science courses by discussing the physical applications of algebra, trigonometry, and differential and integral calculus. This course does not satisfy major, minor, or specialization requirements for Secondary Education and/or Liberal Arts Science Majors. It also does not replace the MAT 181 requirement in Physics and Chemistry major programs.

    Prerequisites: A score of 61 or greater in the ALEKS exam

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 100 – Physics I

    This is the first part of the calculus-based introductory course sequence in physics with lab. This course covers mechanics, vibrations and waves, and thermal physics, and is designed for students in physics, chemistry and related fields.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion or concurrent enrollment in MAT 181 (Calculus I)

    Credits: 4

    Lecture Hours: 3

    Lab Hours: 3

  • PHY 102 – Physics II

    This is the second part of the calculus-based introductory course sequence in physics with lab. This course covers electricity and magnetism, and optics, and is designed for students in physics, chemistry and related fields.

    Prerequisites: PHY 100 (Physics I) and MAT 181 (Calculus I)

    Credits: 4

    Lecture Hours: 3

    Lab Hours: 3

  • PHY 212 – Modern Physics

    This course offers an introduction to the theory of relativity and the ideas of early quantum physics. Topics include special relativity, blackbody radiation, photoelectric effect, Compton effect, x-rays, structure of the atom, emission/absorption spectra and the Bohr Model, wave-particle duality, and wave packets.

    Prerequisites: PHY 102 (Physics II)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 214 – Introduction to Subatomic Physics

    This course provides a continuation of the discussion of early quantum physics into quantum mechanics and an introduction to atomic physics, nuclear physics and modern elementary particle physics.

    Prerequisites: PHY 212 (Modern Physics) and MAT 182 (Calculus II)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 220 – Electronics

    This course covers analog electronics – design and implementation. It includes the characteristics of passive components, solid-state diodes, transistors, and basic integrated circuits. DC and AC analysis of transistor and op-amp circuits leads to a survey of basic amplifier designs. Extensive lab work provides experience building and testing circuits.

    Prerequisites: PHY 42 (General Physics II) or PHY 102 (Physics II)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 3

  • PHY 230 – Optics

    This course provides a survey of optical science and its applications. Emphasis is given to geometrical and physical optics. Geometrical optics considers the propagation of light as rays through simple optical systems (mirrors, lenses, and prisms) leading to discussions of imaging, aberrations, and optical instruments. Physical optics studies include the propagation of light as waves by exploring the theory and applications of interference, diffraction, and polarization effects. Special topics such as quantum optics, integrated optics, Fourier optics, and/or applications in medicine, display technologies, and optical communications are also included.

    Prerequisites: PHY 245 (Mathematical Physics I) and MAT 182 (Calculus II)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 3

  • PHY 245 – Mathematical Physics I

    This is a sophomore-level course on mathematical methods in physics. Many branches of mathematics that have direct applications in physics are discussed with an emphasis on developing problem-solving skills. Topics include complex numbers, linear algebra and vector spaces, vector calculus, Fourier series, and ordinary differential equations.

    Prerequisites: PHY 102 (Physics II) and MAT 181 (Calculus I); or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Computing Hours: 2

  • PHY 250 – Programming for Experimental Research and Industry

    This course covers essential programming methods and techniques used in experimental physics and engineering applications. Students will acquire skills and the tools necessary to interface computer systems with sensor, meters, control devices, measurement systems, etc. Methods of debugging, processing, presenting, and storing data will be covered. Course work will involve extensive programming using LabVIEW, Matlab, and/or C/C++ and/or other programming as appropriate.

    Prerequisites: PHY 42 (General Physics II) or PHY 102 (Physics II)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 5

  • PHY 290 – Introduction to Nanotechnology

    Nanotechnology is the study of fabricating and manipulating matter at the scale of individual to a few atoms and molecules with typical structures ranging from 1 to 100 nanometers. With relentless miniaturization, nanotechnology is the inevitable technology of the future. This course will present the fundamental paradigm shifts implicit in taking conventional technology to the nanoscale, with focus on the dominant role of quantum mechanics and discrete structure of matter and radiation. With that background as a basis, the course will continue on to a comprehensive survey of the specific applications-based segments of nanotechnology, including novel nano-materials, nanoscale circuits and devices, lower dimensional structures, and molecular devices.

    Prerequisites: PHY 214 (Introduction to Subatomic Physics) or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 312 – Classical Mechanics I

    This course offers a comprehensive study of kinematics and dynamics of particles in a Newtonian mechanical framework. Central forces and orbits, scattering, and Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics are also discussed in great detail.

    Prerequisites: PHY 245 (Mathematical Physics I) and MAT 182 (Calculus II)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Computing Hours: 2

  • PHY 314 – Classical Mechanics II

    This course is a continuation of the study of Newtonian mechanics. Topics covered include non-inertial frames, systems of particles, rigid bodies, oscillating systems and normal modes.

    Prerequisites: PHY 312 (Classical Mechanics I) and MAT 283 (Calculus III)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 315 – Advanced Physics Laboratory

    This is an advanced level undergraduate laboratory physics course that features experiments in Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Electricity and Magnetism, and Modern Physics. The experiments are closely related to material covered in other upper-level physics courses. Many experiments require computer simulations or computer-based data acquisition processes.

    Prerequisites: PHY 212 (Modern Physics)

    Credits: 2

    Lab Hours: 4

  • PHY 316 – Electromagnetism I

    This course covers the fundamental principles of the classical theory of electricity and magnetism, and the extension of these principles to Maxwell's Equations. Topics include electrostatics, boundary value problems, magnetostatics, electric and magnetic fields in matter, and time-varying fields.

    Prerequisites: PHY 245 (Mathematical Physics I) and MAT 283 (Calculus III)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Computing Hours: 2

  • PHY 318 – Electromagnetism II

    This course is a continuation of the study of classical electricity and magnetism. Topics include electromagnetic waves, absorption and dispersion, wave guides, gauge transformations, and radiation.

    Prerequisites: PHY 316 (Electromagnetism I)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 327 – Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

    The first part of this course will systematically cover classical thermodynamics with focus on the four laws of thermodynamics and their applications and specific attention to heat engines. The second part of the course will provide an introduction to statistical mechanics, leading up to a derivation of the macroscopic results of thermodynamics from the underlying microscopic theory.

    Prerequisites: PHY 245 (Mathematical Physics I) and MAT 283 (Calculus III)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 340 – Computational Physics

    This course covers the essential numerical methods used in physics and engineering, based on writing and debugging computer programs to implement those methods. Students will acquire the skills and the tools to analyze complex physics and engineering problems numerically, encode them in appropriate software, to be compiled and evaluated on computers to arrive at precise solutions and to present those solutions in graphical format if applicable. Course work will involve programming in Mathematica, Matlab, Fortran and/or C/C++ as appropriate.

    Prerequisites: PHY 245 (Mathematical Physics I) or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3

    Computing Hours: 3

  • PHY 342 – Astrophysics

    This course explores the physics of astronomical phenomena, from processes within our Solar System to the creation and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the Universe. The course is designed for physics majors and other science majors with strong interest in astronomy, physics, and mathematics. This course takes a mathematically rigorous approach of applying basic principles of physics to astronomy, and therefore also provides a foundation for more advanced (undergraduate and graduate level) coursework in astrophysics.

    Prerequisites: PHY 212 (Modern Physics) and MAT 182 (Calculus II)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 345 – Mathematical Physics II

    This is an upper-level course on mathematical methods in physics. Topics include calculus of variation, special functions, complex functions and residue theorem, partial differential equations, and probability and statistics.

    Prerequisites: PHY 245 (Mathematical Physics I) and MAT 283 (Calculus III)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 350 – Instrumentation in Physics

    This course covers the instrumentation commonly used to perform measurements of physical quantities. The underlying physics of different sensors is described, and then these sensors are used in the experiments. Interface circuits and detection techniques are also explored. Extensive laboratory work is involved.

    Prerequisites: PHY 220 (Electronics)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 3

  • PHY 360 – Quantum Mechanics I

    This course explores the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. Topics include the application of Schrödinger equation in one-dimensional systems, Hilbert space formalism, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum algebra, and philosophical implications of quantum mechanics.

    Prerequisites: PHY 214 (Introduction to Subatomic Physics) and PHY 245 (Mathematical Physics I) and MAT 283 (Calculus III)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Computing Hours: 2

  • PHY 361 – Quantum Mechanics II

    This course is the second part of the study of quantum mechanics. Topics include time-independent perturbation theory, variational principle, WKB approximation, time-dependent perturbation theory, adiabatic approximation, and scattering.

    Prerequisites: PHY 360 (Quantum Mechanics I)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • PHY 370 – Research in Physics

    This course involves individual research on a specific problem in physics or a related field under the advice of a faculty member. Students must discuss research opportunities with any faculty member whose areas of expertise interest them. This course can be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and their approval of the project

    Credits: 1-4

    Contact Hours: As determined by the instructor

  • PHY 372-375 – Selected Topics in Physics

    Topics in the field of physics that are of current interest or of special interest to the student will be selected for an in-depth study. The course content will normally change each time the course is offered. The course may be repeated for credit provided that the same topic is not repeated.

    Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and their approval of the topic

    Credits: 1-3

    Contact Hours: As determined by the instructor

  • PHY 380 – Senior Seminar in Physics

    This course consists of readings and discussions in the area of the individual student’s interest in physics in preparation for the Comprehensive Examination in Physics. Required of all Liberal Arts students majoring in Physics.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 2

    Lecture Hours: 2

  • PHY 390 – Internship in Physics

    Supervised, practical work experience in laboratory and/or field situations. Students interested in developing an individualized vocationally oriented program which may assist in future career options may structure a work-study experience with the cooperating agency or organization. A proposal outlining the work-study experience should be submitted to the student's supervising faculty member and the department chairperson. Clock hours will be determined by the cooperating agency or organization. Semester hour credit will be based upon the proposal and scheduled clock hours. A maximum of 4 credits may be applied toward Arts and Sciences electives.

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing

    Credits: 1-4

    Contact Hours: As required by the proposal

  • PHY 395 – Honors Independent Study/Thesis

    This course involves individual research on a specific problem in physics or a related field under the advice of a faculty member. Students must discuss research opportunities with any faculty members whose areas of expertise interest them.

    Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and their approval of the project

    Credits: 1-4

    Contact Hours: As determined by the instructor

Astronomy Courses

The Astronomy concentration as part of the Physics major provides a blend of introductory and specific courses in a broad range of astronomy topics. Students can blend their core courses with choices from a broad range of options, allowing students to tailor their curriculum to their career goals. Specialized instruction on specific topics can be arranged with faculty.

The following courses in Astronomy are presently available at Kutztown University. Additional details on these courses can be found in the course catalog.

  • AST 16 – Core to the Cosmos: Contributions of Women to Astronomy

    From the edge of the cosmos to the cores of planets, the scientific discoveries of women shape our understanding of space. Using the perspective of influential women in astronomy, the course explores major astronomical and planetary science discoveries, such as the expansion of the universe, life cycles of stars, formation of the solar system, and the structure of the Earth as well as their role in space exploration and science missions. This course does not satisfy major, concomitant, or specialization requirements for Secondary Education and/or Liberal Arts Science majors or count toward major GPA for Physics majors.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • AST 20 – Introductory Astronomy

    This course is a descriptive survey of the heavens, including the constellations and stars, the sun and our planetary system, the celestial sphere, our galaxy, binary and variable stars, nebulae, the elements of astrophysics, cosmogony, the history of astronomy. Weekly laboratory exercises are an integral part of the course. This course does not satisfy major, concomitant, or specialization requirements for Secondary Education Science and/or Liberal Arts Science Majors.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 2

  • AST 26 – Elements of Modern Astronomy

    This non-laboratory course is a descriptive study of the heavens, including the constellations and stars, the sun and our planetary system, the celestial sphere, our galaxy, binary and variable stars, nebulae, the elements of astrophysics, cosmology, the history of astronomy. This course does not satisfy major, concomitant, or specialization requirements for Secondary Education and/or Liberal Arts Science majors.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • AST 30 – Mission to the Planets

    More than 50 spacecraft missions have left the Earth's surface in search of answers about the formation of our solar system, our neighboring planets, our moon, and our own planet. These missions illustrate the application of the scientific method in vivid detail as scientists struggled to refine their questions (hypothesis) and obtain the data to test them; then learned to refine the hypothesis and then repeated the process. This course covers the physical, chemical, and geological nature of the planets and their atmospheres; similarities and differences between the Earth and other planets using manned and unmanned space probes and how they have shaped our understanding of the planets. Laboratory experiments illustrate the scientific method and complex decision making required in developing space missions.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 2

  • AST 42 – Stars, Galaxies, and Black Holes

    This course is a descriptive study of stars, galaxies, and black holes. Included in this course are an introduction to the observation and analysis of starlight and an introduction to orbital mechanics and gravity. Stellar evolution is covered in detail, as are the classification of galaxies and the observation and characterization of black holes. A selected series of lectures and hands­ on projects will be done using the planetarium and the on-campus observatory. This course does not satisfy major, concomitant, or specialization requirements for Secondary Education and/or Liberal Arts Science majors nor count toward major GPA for Physics majors.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • AST 140 – Planetary Science

    This course provides an introduction to the observational and quantitative techniques used to understand the characteristics, origin, and evolution of our Solar System. Topics include the formation and evolution of planets, asteroids, comets, moons, and rings. In laboratory exercises, students will use data from NASA and other missions to explore the dynamic evolution of our Solar System.

    Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in PHY 40 (General Physics I) or PHY 80 (Problem-Solving Techniques in Applied Science) or PHY 100 (Physics I), or Successful completion of MAT 181 (Calculus I) with a C or better, or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 3

  • AST 142 – Stellar & Galactic Astronomy

    This course is a survey of stars and stellar systems including the sun as a star, stellar properties and distances, binary stars, variable stars, star clusters, stellar evolution, galaxies and the universe. Some concepts of astrophysics, radio astronomy and cosmology are introduced. There will be several planetarium and telescopic observation sessions. Actual data acquired at national and local observatories, including the Kutztown University Observatory, will be incorporated into laboratory exercises.

    Prerequisites: PHY 40 (General Physics I) or PHY 100 (Physics I) or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 3

  • AST 205 – Planetary Surface Processes

    This course examines the physics of processes that break solid rock into transportable materials and the physical and chemical mechanisms behind the movement and deposition of that material on planetary surfaces. Using quantitative analysis, laboratory, remote sensing, field experiments, and qualitative assessment, this course links the physical and chemical weathering of planetary surfaces, including the fundamentals of fluid flow, sediment transport, erosion, and deposition to processes ranging from microscopic to mountain building. A laboratory course, planetary surface processes focuses on collecting and using actual data sets and applying them to the sedimentary, tectonic, and atmospheric history of a planet.

    Prerequisites: PHY 40 (General Physics I) or PHY 80 (Problem-Solving Techniques in Applied Science) or PHY 100 (Physics I) or GEL 100 (Physical Geology) or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 3

  • AST 240 – The Planetarium

    This course introduces students to the planetarium, its operation, and its maintenance. The student will learn the operation of the digital planetarium projection system and the

    computer scripting program used to create planetarium presentations. Also covered in this course are methods of digital image, video, and audio manipulation.

    Prerequisites: AST 142 (Stellar & Galactic Astronomy) or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 3

  • AST 242 – Exoplanets

    This course is a survey of exoplanets, planetary systems, and the solar system as a planetary system. Fundamental concepts in astrophysics concerning the solar system, plan­etary system formation and evolution, and exoplanet detection and characterization are introduced. There will be several planetarium and telescopic observing sessions. Actual data acquired at national and local observatories, including the Kutztown University Ob­servatory, will be incorporated into laboratory exercises, as will the professional reduction, analysis, and communication of astronomical data. Participants in the course may have the opportunity to contribute to the discovery and/or characterization of new exoplanets.

    Prerequisites: AST 142 (Stellar & Galactic Astronomy) or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 2

    Lab Hours: 3

  • AST 342 – Astrophysics

    This course explores the physics of astronomical phenomena, from processes within our Solar System to the creation and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the Universe. The course is designed for physics majors and other science majors with strong interest in astronomy, physics, and mathematics. This course takes a mathematically rigorous approach of applying basic principles of physics to astronomy, and therefore also provides a foundation for more advanced (undergraduate and graduate level) coursework in astrophysics.

    Prerequisites: PHY 212 (Modern Physics) and MAT 182 (Calculus II)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • AST 350 – Practical Astronomy

    This course is concerned with a study of the techniques required in making and reducing astronomical observations. The positional aspects of astronomy will be covered in detail. This course will also focus attention on methods modern data collection, reduction, and

    analysis using CCD detector systems, and on the various types of telescopes. The students will be required to carry out observing projects using the Kutztown University’s on-campus telescope and the remote robotic telescopes located in New Mexico and South Australia.

    Prerequisites: PHY 102 (Physics II) and AST 142 (Stellar & Galactic Astronomy) and MAT 182 (Calculus II)

    Credits: 4

    Lecture Hours: 3

    Lab Hours: 3

  • AST 370 – Research in Astronomy

    This course will involve an individual research program on a specialized topic in astronomy and will require either library research, observational work using Kutztown University's on­ campus telescopes and/or remote robotic telescopes, computer simulations, the planetarium, or a combination of these. The results of such work might be published. This course may be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and their approval of the project

    Credits: 1-4

    Contact Hours: As determined by the instructor

  • AST 395 – Honors Independent Study/Thesis

    This course involves individual research on a specific problem in astronomy or a related field under the advice of a faculty member. Students must discuss research opportunities with any faculty members whose areas of expertise interest them.

    Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and their approval of the project

    Credits: 3

    Contact Hours: As determined by the instructor

Engineering Courses

The Engineering and Engineering Technology concentrations as part of the Physics major provides a blend of engineering courses covering a broad range of topics. Students can blend their core physics courses with a broad range of engineering specific courses, allowing students to tailor their curriculum to their career goals. Specialized instruction on specific topics can be arranged with faculty.

The following courses in Engineering and Engineering Technology are presently available at Kutztown University. Additional details on these courses can be found in the course catalog.

  • EGR 121 – Engineering Drawing and Design

    This course is an introduction to basic mechanical drawing emphasizing multi-view and pictorial drawing, dimensioning, space analysis, graphs and engineering standards. Lettering and experiences with various design tools and media will facilitate the development of the graphic communication skills for the engineer/draftsman/designer.

    Prerequisites: None

    Credits: 3

    Lab Hours: 6

  • EGR 130 – Engineering Mechanics

    This course is an introduction to the study of both statics and dynamics with a concentration in engineering applications. Topics include statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, analysis of structures and distribution of forces in beams and cables, work-energy, impulse-momentum, and systems of particles and rigid bodies.

    Prerequisites: PHY 100 (Physics I) and MAT 181 (Calculus I)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • EGR 230 – Strength of Materials

    This course is an introduction to the study of the mechanical behavior of materials. Topics include transverse shear in beams, Mohr’s circle for stress, plastic yield criteria, deflection of beams, fatigue and fracture, column buckling and stresses in thick-walled cylinders.

    Prerequisites: EGR 130 (Engineering Mechanics) and MAT 182 (Calculus II)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • EGR 370 – Research in Engineering

    This course involves individual research on a specific problem in engineering or a related field under the advice of a faculty member. Students must discuss research opportunities with any faculty members whose areas of expertise interest them. This course can be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and their approval of the project

    Credits: 1-4

    Contact Hours: As determined by the instructor

  • EGR 330 – Fluid Mechanics

    This course is an introduction to the study of fluid mechanics. Topics include kinematics of fluid flow and similarity concepts, equations of incompressible fluid flow with inviscid and viscous applications, turbulence, one-dimensional compressible flow, shock waves, boundary layers, separation, wakes and drag.

    Prerequisites: PHY 245 (Mathematical Physics I) and MAT 283 (Calculus III)

    Credits: 3

    Lecture Hours: 3

  • EGR 390 – Internship in Engineering

    Supervised, practical work experience in laboratory and/or field situations. Students interested in developing an individualized vocationally oriented program which may assist in future career options may structure a work-study experience with the cooperating agency or organization. A proposal outlining the work-study experience should be submitted to the student's supervising faculty member and the department chairperson. Clock hours will be determined by the cooperating agency or organization. Semester hour credit will be based upon the proposal and scheduled clock hours.

    Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing

    Credits: 1-5

    Contact Hours: As required by the proposal