Course Offerings

View the official Course Catalog and Course Descriptions

  • MAT 17 - Introduction to Mathematics

    The goal of this General Education introductory-level course is to acquaint the student with the nature and spirit of mathematics – terminology, fundamental principles, generalizations, and their application to problem solving –through study of a broad spectrum of topics. The underlying thrust of the course will be to bolster the students’ analytical and critical thinking skills, and to develop the ability to effectively communicate the rationale behind this thinking. Areas of coverage will include Problem Solving Strategies and Techniques, Set Theory, and at least three additional appropriate areas of Mathematical Inquiry. Applications of the mathematical concepts and techniques taught in this course will also be illustrated. This course cannot be used by mathematics majors to fulfill mathematics major program requirements.

  • MAT 40 - Geometry

    An informal, intuitive study of topics in geometry. Non-metric geometry of the plane and space; measurement; error in measuring; simple closed curves; area; congruence; similarity; graphing in the plane and space; modern geometries; groups of geometric transformations. Open to all majors.

  • MAT 45 - Women in Mathematics

    This course examines women and minorities who have made significant contributions to the field of mathematics. Both their lives and their work will be explored as well as gender and multicultural issues surrounding their endeavors. Furthermore, mathematical topics related to their contributions will be discussed.

  • MAT 89 - The Art of Mathematics

    This General Education introductory-level course will examine mathematics as art. The work of both historical and contemporary mathematicians will be studied with a focus on their content and form as well as those who influenced their mathematical work. Mathematical topics related to their contributions will be discussed with an emphasis on developing an appreciation of the beauty of mathematics. This course cannot be used by mathematics majors to fulfill mathematics major program requirements.

  • MAT 103 - Fundamentals of Mathematics I

    This is the first course in a two-course sequence that is required for all Elementary Education and Special Education majors. It is restricted to only Education majors or permission of the department. Topics include problem solving; logic; set theory; mathematical systems; systems of numeration; number theory; equations and inequalities; and properties of whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers. A calculator is required for this course. This course cannot be used by mathematics majors to fulfill mathematics major program requirements.

  • MAT 104 QL - Fundamentals of Mathematics II

    This is the second course in a two-course sequence that is required for all Elementary Education and Special Education majors. It is restricted to only Education majors or permission of the department. Topics include informal geometry; measurement; probability; statistics; and computer applications. A calculator is required. This course cannot be used by mathematics majors to fulfill mathematics major program requirements.

  • MAT 105 - College Algebra

    Topics include properties of the real numbers, problem-solving using equations and inequalities, algebraic functions, graphing, and systems of equations. A graphing calculator is required for this course. This course cannot be used by mathematics majors to fulfill mathematics major program requirements.

  • MAT 106 – Trigonometry

    This course is intended for students with an elementary knowledge of algebra who need more work in trigonometric topics before taking more advanced mathematics courses. Topics include properties of and operations with functions, inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, angle measurement, trigonometric functions and their inverses, graphing functions, and problem solving with equations that use the functions covered in the course. This course cannot be used by mathematics majors to fulfill mathematics major program requirements.

  • MAT 115 – Precalculus

    This course is designed to give students a thorough review of the mathematics background needed for calculus courses. The course covers all the topics listed in the descriptions of MAT 105 and MAT 106. A graphing calculator is required for this course.

  • MAT 121 - Mathematics for Business & Information Sciences

    This course focuses on the application of mathematical concepts and methods to problems that arise for students who major in Business or Computer Science. The topics include systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, linear programming with graphical and simplex method solutions, mathematics of finance, set theory and probability. This course cannot be used by mathematics majors to fulfill mathematics major program requirements.  A graphing calculator is required for this course.

  • MAT 122 - Applied Calculus

    This course focuses on the application of concepts and methods of calculus to problems that arise for students who major in Business or Computer Science. The topics include functions and models; differential and integral calculus; applying derivatives, differentials, and integrals to problem-solving; and applied optimization. This course cannot be used by mathematics majors to fulfill mathematics major program requirements. A graphing calculator is required for this course.

  • MAT 123 - Discrete Mathematics

    This general Education course is an introduction to discrete mathematics, a branch of mathematics that solves problems such as finding the probability of being dealt a straight flush in 5-card poker, protecting financial information from hackers, and enabling error-free communication with astronauts in space. Course material is drawn from areas of mathematics such as number theory, combinatorics, probability, and abstract algebra. This course serves students who are interested in introductory mathematics that is not in the same vein as precalculus and calculus.

  • MAT 140 QL - Applied Statistics

    This course is an introduction to quantitative methods as applied to statistical reporting and data analysis. It will incorporate some or all of the following: Techniques for obtaining, analyzing and presenting data in numerical form; measures of central tendency and dispersion; the normal distribution curve; standard scores; applicability of probability and sampling theory to statistical research; interpretation of confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; correlation; linear regression. Students cannot receive credit for both MAT 140 and MAT 150. This course cannot be used by mathematics majors to fulfill mathematics major program requirements. A graphing calculator is required for this course.

  • MAT 181 - Calculus I (4 c.h.)

    This course is one of a series intended for students who major in mathematics, the sciences, or engineering. The topics include the definition and calculation of limits, continuity and differentiability, differentials, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, the application of derivatives to graphing, antiderivatives, and the introduction of the definite integral, applications of definite integrals; and some techniques of integration.

  • MAT 182 - Calculus II (4 c.h.)

    This course is one of a series intended for students who major in mathematics, the sciences, or engineering. The topics include the definition, properties, and applications of definite integrals, properties, derivatives, and integrals of exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, and hyperbolic functions with applications; techniques of integration; indeterminate forms and improper integrals; sequences, series, and convergence tests; differentiation and integration of power series; and polar integrals.

  • MAT 210 CM CP- Mathematical Computing and Typesetting

    This course is an introduction to mathematical computing and typesetting. Topics will include the syntax and programming interface of a computer algebra system that is commonly used in mathematics, methods to solve mathematical problems, and document preparation in the typesetting language LaTeX. The computer algebra system will be used to solve problems drawn from algebra, calculus, differential equations, probability, statistics, discrete mathematics, and modeling. Problems may involve root-finding, solving equations, splines, graphics, power series, numerical integration, numerical approximations of solutions of differential equations, mathematical modeling, data analysis and curve fitting, cryptography, graph theory, number theoretic computations, and possibly others depending on the interests of the students and instructor.  Results from the projects will be typeset in LaTeX.

  • MAT 220 - History of Mathematics

    This course explores the development of mathematics over a period of four millennia--from the time of ancient civilizations to the present. It studies how diverse cultures from almost all parts of the world—Babylonia and Egypt, Greece, China, India, The Middle East, Europe and later the Americas, have contributed to the growth of the discipline of mathematics. This course addresses mathematical methods that were used and contributions that were made by specific mathematicians and cultures. The diverse perspectives at different periods of history that contributed to, and at times hindered, the growth of mathematics are studied.

  • MAT 224 WI - Foundations of Higher Mathematics

    This course is designed to prepare the student for the study of advanced mathematics. Topics include fundamentals of logic, proof strategies, the algebra of sets; relations, including equivalence relations; functions and their properties; countable sets and counting techniques; ordered and well-ordered sets.

  • MAT 240 - Synthetic Geometry

    This course is designed for students who have, in addition to an interest in geometry, some previous experience in this subject area, either on the high school or college level. Topics include Euclidean geometry using Hilbert's axioms; neutral geometry; the historical development of non-Euclidean geometries; and hyperbolic geometry.

  • MAT 260 - Linear Algebra I

    This course gives the student an opportunity to make an in-depth investigation of a specialized area of mathematics which has wide-spread practical applications in the arts and sciences but still allows work with abstract concepts. Topics include a study of the properties of vector spaces; matrix theory with applications using systems of equations and determinants; linear transformations and invariants under such mappings.

  • MAT 283 - Calculus III (4 c.h.)

    This course is one of a series intended for students who major in mathematics, the sciences, or engineering. The topics include vectors in two and three dimensions; operations on vectors; limits, derivatives and integrals of vector functions; three-dimensional surfaces; the definition, properties, and partial differentiation of functions in more than on variable with applications; finding the extrema of functions in two variables; Lagrange multipliers; multipliers; multiple integrals in various coordinate systems; Jacobians; line integrals in vector fields; and the application of Green’s Theorem, The Divergence Theorem, and Stokes’ Theorem. 

  • MAT 301 - Probability & Statistics I

    Elementary probability spaces; conditional probability; general probability spaces; random variables; expectation; variance; multivariant distributions; the algebra of expectation.

  • MAT 302 - Probability & Statistics II

    Probability distributions; sampling; estimation of parameters; Central Limit Theorem; confidence intervals; correlation and regression; sampling from a normal population; testing hypotheses; Markov chains. Students will be required to use appropriate computer software.

  • MAT 305 - Mathematics of Finance I

    This course is an introduction to mathematics of finance. The main topics include measurement of interest, time value of money, annuities, amortization and sinking funds, bonds, capitalized cost, net present value, yield rates, yield curves, duration, immunization. A financial calculator (BA II Plus or BA II Plus Professional preferred) is required for this course.

  • MAT 306 - Mathematics of Finance II

    This is an introduction to financial mathematics and is a continuation course of Financial Mathematics I. The main topics include bonds, capitalized cost, net present value, yield rates, yield curves, duration, immunization, derivative products including calls, puts, forwards, and swaps. A financial calculator is required for this course.

  • MAT 311 - Abstract Algebra I

    Sets, relations, and functions; groups; rings; integral domains; fields; elementary theory of groups.

  • MAT 312 - Abstract Algebra II

    Extension of Abstract Algebra I topics; permutation groups; normal subgroups and quotient groups; rings and ideals; ring homomorphisms; quotient rings, integral domains and their fields of quotients; fields; polynomial rings.

  • MAT 321 – Combinatorics

    This is an introductory course in combinatorics. Topics include introductory and advanced counting techniques, graph theory, and selected topics chosen from recurrence relations, generating functions and integer partitions, and extremal combinatorics.

  • MAT 330 - Theory of Numbers

    This is an introductory course in number theory. The topics covered begin with divisibility and factorization, the Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic, prime numbers, greatest common divisor, and least common multiples. The course continues with congruences and arithmetic functions. The remainder of the course introduces one or more advanced topics such as quadratic residues, primitive roots, Diophantine equations, continued fractions, and crytography.

  • MAT 337 - Introduction to Cryptography

    The course is an introduction to cryptography, the study of securing communication and information. This course will cover the mathematical, algorithmic, and historical aspects of classical and modern cryptography. We will also introduce students to personal encryption software as well as programming libraries and computer algebra systems that allow one to perform large computations necessary for cryptographic applications. Topics will include classical and modern symmetric ciphers, public-key cryptography (e.g. RSA), various cryptographic protocols, and any other topics of interest to the instructor and students. All necessary theoretical background will be reviewed, but some background in number theory, abstract algebra, probability, or computer science will be expected.

  • MAT 340 - Differential Equations

    In this course students will develop an understanding of the basic theory, applications and connections of linear algebra and differential equations. Topics include: first, second, and higher order ordinary differential equations; methods of solutions include exact, substitution reduction, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, power series solutions, the Laplace Transform, and system of linear differential equations. Consideration is given to applications to the physical and natural sciences. Students will be required to use appropriate computer software.

  • MAT 351 - Real Analysis I

    Introduction to the structure of the real number system and its topology; metric space and its topology; basic theorems of real analysis; differentiable functions.

  • MAT 352 - Real Analysis II

    Introduction to the theory of Reimann-Stieltjes integration; functions of bounded variation; Lebesgue measure and Lebesgue integrals; uniform convergence of sequences and series of functions.

  • MAT 361 - Mathematical Methods in Operations Research I

    Operations Research uses quantitative methods to determine the best decision for an operating system. A mathematical approach to studying methods as applied to the decision process in industry is taken. The methods studied are selected from among: linear programming; game theory; graph theory and network analysis. Students will be required to use appropriate computer software.

  • MAT 362 - Mathematical Methods in Operations Research II

    Operations Research uses quantitative methods to determine the best decision for an operating system. A mathematical approach to studying methods as applied to the decision process in industry is taken. The methods studied are selected from among: linear programming; game theory; integer programming; graph theory and network analysis; nonlinear programming; and metaheuristics. Students will be required to use appropriate computer software.

  • MAT 369 - Introduction to Graph Theory

    This course is an introduction to the theory of graphs. The main topics include definitions and examples of graphs and subgraphs, trees, connectivity, Euler tours and Hamilton cycles, matchings, edge and vertex colorings, planar graphs, directed graphs, networks, and its applications.

  • MAT 380 WI - Senior Seminar

    Readings and discussions in areas of student interest and background. The student reviews and structures the mathematics he/she has learned and also explores mathematical topics not covered in the usual course offerings. The comprehensive examination for Arts and Sciences Mathematics majors is given in conjunction with this course.

  • MAT 400 - Complex Variables

    This is an introductory course in Complex Analysis. Topics include properties of complex numbers, analytic functions, mappings, contour integrals, Cauchy’s residue theorem, and the geometric properties of complex functions.

  • MAT 403 - Analysis of Data Sets

    This course continues the development of the concepts and procedures of MAT 230 or both MAT 301 and MAT 302 with an emphasis on practical applications to science, business, and industry. A review of basic statistical concepts, regression analysis, categorical data analysis, analysis of variance, and nonparametric statistics will be presented. Up-to-date examples using computer statistical packages will be used. The student is expected to apply the above techniques to real-world problems. Students will be required to use appropriate computer software.

The following courses have not been offered in a while as standard classes.  However, most are available via Individualized Instruction.  Please ask a mathematics professor for details!

  • MAT 150 - Introduction to Biostatistics

    This course in an introduction to the study of Biostatistics intended for students of the life science disciplines. It is an overview of the statistical methods for obtaining, analyzing and presenting data in numerical form that are most often used in the area of life sciences. A problem-based approach using real data in various life science fields will be used to illustrate various statistical procedures as well as basics of elementary applied statistics. Students cannot receive credit for both MAT 140 and MAT 150. This course cannot be used by mathematics majors to fulfill mathematics major program requirements.

  • MAT 270 – Biostatistics

    This  course focuses  on  enhancing  students'  abilities in  problem  solving  in  statistics with  a concentration on applications to biology. The course is a calculus-based course in biostatistics emphasizing methods for collecting, graphing, examining, and interpreting data. The course provides both the theoretical framework and the analytical tools for performing data analysis. Special emphasis will be placed upon using available statistical methods for both exploratory and confirmatory data analysis. Topics include discrete and continuous random variables, mean and variance, hypothesis testing and confidence limits, nonparametric methods, Student's t-test, analysis of variance, correlation, and ordinary least squares. It may include a subset of further topics which may include, but not be limited to, contingency table analysis, random effects models, mixed models, regression, sensitivity and specificity.

  • MAT 300 - Problem Solving in Mathematics

    This course focuses on enhancing students’ abilities in problem solving in mathematics and presenting their ideas effectively through writing down logical proofs in a precise and concise manner. This course will discuss problems coming from a broad range of topics, including but not limited to, precalculus, calculus, analysis, and linear algebra. This course is designed for students with a strong desire to solve challenging mathematical problems.

  • MAT 332 - Numerical Analysis

    Numerical methods fundamental to scientific computing are developed. Topics include finite difference calculus; zeros of a function; matrix computations; solutions to systems of linear equations; approximation by polynomials; numerical differentiation and integration; numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations; rounding errors and other types of errors. Selected algorithms will be run on the computer. Students will be required to use appropriate computer software.

  • MAT 431 – Topology

    Set theory; functions; metric spaces; basic topological concepts; topologies and neighborhood systems; open and closed sets; accumulation points and closures; bases and subbases for a topology; separation and connectedness; nets; continuity and homeomorphisms; compactness; product and quotient spaces.

  • MAT 460 - Linear Algebra II

    This course is a study of advanced topics in Linear Algebra. Topics include: review of the properties of vector spaces; study of inner product spaces; factorization of a matrix in QR, diagonalized, and singular value decomposition forms; eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices with applications to solving differential equations; positive definite matrices and their applications; and numerical linear algebra.

  • MAT 473 - Partial Differential Equations

    Equations of first order, Hamilton-Jacobi theory; the Cauchy Problem; the Dirichlet and Newman problems, Existence Theorems; Green's Functions; Equations of mathematical physics; integral equations.