MSW Course Offerings & Descriptions

The Master of Social Work Program offers a wide variety of courses at different levels, depending on the student's experience.

Schedule of Course Offerings

Schedule options include weekday and executive schedule (classes offered on Tuesday evenings and Saturdays utilizing an online hybrid model). 

Foundation Level Courses
  • SWK400 Foundations in Human Behavior in the Social Environment

    This course, for foundation-year graduate students in social work, teaches students to critically evaluate and apply biological, psychological, and social theories to client situations across the lifespan. Effects of the interplay of biological, psychological, social, economical and cultural elements of the social environment on human functioning are examined. Systems promoting or deterring people in the attainment and maintenance of optimal health and well-being are explored with particular attention on the effects over the life course of these systems on populations at risk, ethnic and racial minorities, sexual minorities, women, and persons with disability. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK450 Foundations in Social Work Practice with Individuals

    Students will learn a problem-solving process that includes relationship building, prevention, planning, interviewing techniques, case recording, termination and evaluation. Attention to the evolution of social work practice from an historical and international perspective will establish the context for this introduction to contemporary practice. Students will be expected to participate in a laboratory experience involving a helping relationship project. Knowledge and skills relevant to practice with populations at risk including women, people of color, people who are gay and lesbian, and people who are economically impoverished will be emphasized. Issues of oppression, diversity, social justice, values, and ethics will be integrated throughout the course. This course is required of all Master's of Social Work students. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK455 Foundations of Social Welfare Policies

    This course, for foundation-year graduate students in social work, provides an historical perspective for understanding current issues in social work and social welfare. The policy-making process is critically examined and the major actors associated with it are identified. A significant part of the course will be spent in the study of major welfare policies and the groups affected by them. Strategies and involvement of people for policy change are examined. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK460 Foundations of Social Work Research Methods

    This course, for foundation-year graduate students, uses the scientific inquiry model for social and behavioral science research in social work practice. Students develop skills in formulating research problems and questions, conducting a comprehensive literature review, establishing hypotheses and choosing research designs, both quantitative and qualitative. Data collection instruments, analysis techniques and report writing are emphasized. Ethical issues related to human subjects, as well as sensitivity to the diversity of research participants are included. Emphasis is placed on social work practice evaluation techniques, including single-subject as well as experimental and quasi-experimental designs. Computers and information technology for social work practice are introduced. The use of appropriate statistical techniques in data analysis is covered. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK460 Foundations of Social Work Practice with Groups and Families

    This course for foundation level graduate students in social work continues the study of the problem solving approach with multi-level client systems (individual, groups, families, communities, organizations). The course focuses on concepts, methods, and skills in social work practice with groups and families. Family development and dynamics will be studied and social work intervention techniques with emphasis on problem solving will be examined. Through class discussions, exercises and group projects, students will apply their understanding of group dynamics and family assessment, and demonstrate social work practice skills with groups and families. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK480 Foundations of Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities

    This course for foundation level graduate students in social work continues the study of the problem solving approach with multi-level client systems (individual, groups, families, communities, organizations). This course reinforces and applies social work knowledge, values, and skills using the problem solving approach and focuses on intervention strategies with communities and organizations. Students practice generalist social work within a systems theory framework. A policy practice emphasis is applied for advocacy and change strategies with agencies and communities. Particular attention will be given to strategies of change with populations at risk. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK481 Foundation Internship I

    This internship is the first of two foundation-level, graduate semesters (total 480 hours) of field instruction in social welfare agency settings, which are required under the supervision of a professional social worker. Students apply foundation knowledge, skills, values, and ethics of professional generalist practice. Through supervision, students enhance their awareness of self, develop written and oral communication skills necessary for analysis of professional practice, and apply critical analytic skills for implementing and evaluating agency policies and programs. Students operationalize the unique values, functions and roles of professional social work practice and develop competency in identifying and assessing situations where the relationship of people and their social environment needs to be enhanced or changed. The professional responsibility of advocacy toward change and recognition of the impact of policy and programs on oppressed groups is an integral part of the applied learning, as is development of professional identity. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course to enter SWK483, Foundation Internship II. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 482, Integrated Professional Generalist Social Work Practice Seminar I. Prerequisites: SWK400, SWK450, SWK460 (or can be taken concurrently). 4 S.H., 4 C.H.

  • SWK482 Integrated Generalist Social Work Practice Seminar I

    This seminar, the first of two for foundation-level MSW students, begins an effective bridge to align the liberal arts perspective expected of entering graduate-level students and the advanced level family-in-environment content. The following concepts will be introduced and reinforced: the history and philosophy of the social work profession, social work values and ethics, the Generalist Intervention Model of Social Work, populations at risk, cultural diversity, promotion of social and economic justice, and fields of social work practice. The seminars complement the Field Instruction and provide a structured learning opportunity where students process their practice experiences and integrate the common base of social work values, skills, and knowledge of generalist social work in a systems theory perspective. The seminars also assist students to expand their knowledge of the human services field beyond the confines of their own placement. Topics and policies of social work and social welfare are discussed, based in large part, on the experiences of students in the field through written logs, client summaries, and classroom discussions of experiences including feelings about their social work practice. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 481. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK483 Foundation Internship II

    This is the second semester of field instruction (a total of 480 hours) in social welfare agency settings which is required under the supervision of a professional social worker. Students apply foundation knowledge, skills, values, and ethics of professional generalist practice. Through supervision, students enhance their awareness of self, develop written and oral communication skills necessary for analysis of professional practice, and apply critical analytic skills for implementing and evaluating agency policies and programs. Students operationalize the unique values, functions and roles of professional social work practice and develop competency in identifying and assessing situations where the relationship of people and their social environment needs to be enhanced or changed. The professional responsibility of advocacy toward change and recognition of the impact of policy and programs on oppressed groups is an integral part of the applied learning. An agency-based research project is required in this semester of fieldwork. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 484, Integrated Social Work Practice Seminar II. Prerequisites: SWK 481 and SWK 482. 4 S.H., 4 C.H.

  • SWK484 Integrated Generalist Social Work Practice Seminar II

    This seminar, the second of two for foundation-level MSW students, continues aligning the liberal arts perspective expected of entering graduate-level students and the advanced level family-in-environment content. The following concepts will be integrated: professional use of self, social work values and ethics in the context of the mandate of the setting, the Generalist Intervention Model of Social Work, populations at risk, cultural diversity, promotion of social and economic justice, and fields of social work practice. The seminars complement the Field Instruction and provide a structured learning opportunity where students process their practice experiences and integrate the common base of social work values, skills, and knowledge of generalist social work in a systems theory perspective. The seminars also assist students to expand their knowledge of the human services field beyond the confines of their own placement. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 483. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

Advanced Standing Courses

Summer Bridge for Advanced Standing

  • SWK491 Internship for Advanced Standing I

    This internship is the first of two graduate semesters (total 480 hours) of field instruction in social welfare agency settings which are offered to students entering the graduate social work program under advanced-standing status under the supervision of a professional social worker prior to their advanced-year studies. Students re-visit and apply foundation knowledge, skills, values, and ethics of professional generalist practice. Through supervision, students enhance their awareness of self, develop written and oral communication skills necessary for analysis of professional practice, and apply critical analytic skills for implementing and evaluating agency policies and programs. Students review the unique values, functions and roles of professional social work practice and further develop competency in identifying and assessing situations where the relationship of people and their social environment needs to be enhanced or changed. The professional responsibility of advocacy toward change and recognition of the impact of policy and programs on oppressed groups is an integral part of the applied learning, as is development of professional identity. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 492. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK 492 Generalist Social Work Practice for Advanced Standing I

    This seminar, the first of two for incoming MSW students with advanced standing status, begins an effective bridge to align the beginning generalist practice expected of graduate-level students and the advanced level family-in-environment content. The following concepts will be reinforced: the history and philosophy of the social work profession, social work values and ethics, the Generalist Intervention Model of Social Work, populations at risk, cultural diversity, promotion of social and economic justice, and fields of social work practice. The seminars complement the Field Instruction and provide a structured learning opportunity where students process their practice experiences and integrate the common base of social work values, skills, and knowledge of generalist social work in a systems theory perspective. The seminars also assist students to expand their knowledge of the human services field beyond the confines of their own placement. Topics and policies of social work and social welfare are discussed, based in large part, on the experiences of students in the field through written logs, client summaries, and classroom discussions of experiences including feelings about their social work practice. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 491. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK493 Internship for Advanced Standing II

    This is the second semester of field instruction (a total of 480 hours) in social welfare agency settings for students with advanced standing status, which is required under the supervision of a professional social worker prior to advanced-year studies. Students apply foundation knowledge, skills, values, and ethics of professional generalist practice. Through supervision, students enhance their awareness of self, develop written and oral communication skills necessary for analysis of professional practice, and apply critical analytic skills for implementing and evaluating agency policies and programs. Students operationalize the unique values, functions and roles of professional social work practice and develop competency in identifying and assessing situations where the relationship of people and their social environment needs to be enhanced or changed. The professional responsibility of advocacy toward change and recognition of the impact of policy and programs on oppressed groups is an integral part of the applied learning. An agency-based research project is required in this semester of fieldwork. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 494, Advanced Generalist Social Work Theory and Practice II. Prerequisites: SWK 491 and SWK 492. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK494 Generalist Social Work Practice for Advanced Standing II

    This seminar, the second of two for incoming MSW students with advanced standing status, continues to align the beginning generalist practice expected of graduate-level students and the advanced level family-in-environment content. The following concepts will be integrated: professional use of self, social work values and ethics in the context of the mandate of the setting, the Generalist Intervention Model of Social Work, populations at risk, cultural diversity, promotion of social and economic justice, and fields of social work practice. The Seminars complement the Field Instruction and provide a structured learning opportunity where students process their practice experiences and integrate the common base of social work values, skills, and knowledge of generalist social work in a systems theory perspective. The seminars also assist students to expand their knowledge of the human services field beyond the confines of their own placement. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 493. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

Advanced Level Courses
  • SWK500 Families in the Social Environment

    This course is part of the advanced year of study for graduate students of social work, in which foundation knowledge of human behavior in the social environment is further developed into a specialized knowledge base. This knowledge is necessary for effective social work practice with and on behalf of families. Students will acquire a comprehensive conceptualization of the strengths and needs of diverse family forms and an understanding of the social, cultural, economic, and political factors as well as the social service delivery system which influence and shape family life across the lifespan and the family as a social institution. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK555 Applied Family Policy and Family Service Programs

    This course will explore the interrelation between family functioning and public/private policies at the local, state, and federal level. Students will explore how the families contribute to social problems, how families are affected by these problems, and how a family focus can enhance the effectiveness of policies. Students will assess the consequences policies may have for family well-being with special attention to selected family policy issues. The course will include theoretical approaches for conceptualizing family policy and, most importantly, the roles professionals can play in using research to design, implement, and evaluate policies and programs. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK560 Applied Methods of Social Work Research

    This course for the advanced year social work students, builds on the foundation level research course by allowing students to specialize in program and practice evaluation of services with and on behalf of families. Single system and group designs will be studied. Descriptive statistics and graphical representation of data using computer software will be utilized. Values and ethical issues related to research with particular sensitivity to populations at risk will be considered as an integral parts of any social work research. Qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis will be employed, and students will be introduced to the use of research in the prevention of social problems. Emphasis will be placed on the critical use of research at each phase of the problem solving process. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK581 Advanced Internship I

    This internship is the first of two advanced-level, graduate semesters (total 480 hours) of field instruction in social welfare agency settings which are offered to advanced-level students and required, under the supervision of a professional social worker. Students apply advanced knowledge of families in the social environment, advanced competence, and the highly articulated values and ethics of advanced generalist practice with and on behalf of families. Through supervision, students crystallize their unique professional use of self in the context of their placement. They refine written and oral communication skills necessary for analysis of professional practice and apply critical analytic skills for differential assessment, selecting interventions, implementing and evaluating agency policies and programs. Students operationalize the unique values, functions and roles of professional social work practice in their practicum setting and develop competency in identifying and assessing situations where the relationship of people and their social environment needs to be enhanced or changed. The professional responsibility of advocacy toward change and recognition of the impact of policy and programs on oppressed groups is an integral part of the applied learning, as is refinement of professional identity. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 582, Advanced Theories of Social Work Practice I. Prerequisites: SWK500, SWK560 (or can be taken concurrently). 4 S.H., 4 C.H.

  • SWK582 Advanced Theory in Family-Centered Generalist Social Work Practice I

    This is a concentration course, for specialized knowledge-building. It is the first in a series of two theoretical seminars for advanced-level MSW students. Course content is concentrated on the family as a universal social institution and may be classified into three areas: 1) the development of the values, knowledge and skills of the autonomous social work practitioner for work with and on behalf of families; 2) research on the advancement of knowledge about family functioning; and 3) the effective, efficient, and humane organization of social service delivery networks serving families. The course also offers students opportunities to interact and integrate knowledge related to their varied practica in order to expand their knowledge of the human services field beyond the confines of their own placement. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 581. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK583 Advanced Internship II

    This internship is the second of two advanced-level, graduate semesters (total 480 hours) of field instruction in social welfare agency settings which are offered to advanced-level students and required, under the supervision of a professional social worker. Students apply advanced knowledge of families in the social environment, advanced competence, and the highly articulated values and ethics of advanced generalist practice with and on behalf of families. Through supervision, students crystallize their unique professional use of self in the context of their placement. They refine written and oral communication skills necessary for analysis of professional practice and apply critical analytic skills for differential assessment, selecting interventions, implementing and evaluating agency policies and programs. Students operationalize the unique values, functions and roles of professional social work practice in their practicum setting and develop competency in identifying and assessing situations where the relationship of people and their social environment needs to be enhanced or changed. The professional responsibility of advocacy toward change and recognition of the impact of policy and programs on oppressed groups is an integral part of the applied learning, as is refinement of professional identity. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 584, Advanced Theories of Social Work Practice II. Prerequisites: SWK581, SWK582. 4 S.H., 4 C.H.

  • SWK 584 Advanced Theory in Family-Centered Generalist Social Work Practice II

    This is a concentration course, for specialized knowledge-building. It is the second in a series of two theoretical seminars for advanced-level MSW students. Course content is concentrated on the family as a universal social institution and may be classified into three areas: 1) the development of the values, knowledge and skills of the autonomous social work practitioner for work with and on behalf of families; 2) research on the advancement of knowledge about family functioning; and 3) the effective, efficient, and humane organization of social service delivery networks serving families. The course also offers students opportunities to interact and integrate knowledge related to their varied practica in order to expand their knowledge of the human services field beyond the confines of their own placement. Must be taken concurrently with SWK 583. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

  • SWK595 Capstone Experience: Social Work and the Family-In-Environment

    This advance-level course for graduate students in social work represents the culmination of students' educational experience. This course is designed to draw on all previous courses and to engage students in integrating and applying all previous course and field practica content. 3 S.H., 3 C.H.

One Credit Elective Courses
  • SWK501 Treatment Modalities for Social Work with Families

    This one-credit elective course is designed to help the advanced-year graduate student in social work who is interested in direct practice with families toward a fuller understanding of the applications of specialized methods of intervention in social work practice with a broad array of families. It builds on knowledge of families in the social environment as considered in SWK500 as well as knowledge related to generalist social work practice. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK502 Social Work Crisis Intervention with Families

    This one-credit elective course is designed to help the student who is interested in direct practice with families toward a fuller understanding of the application of crisis intervention methods in social work practice with a broad array of families. It builds on knowledge of families in the social environment as considered in SWK500 as well as knowledge related to generalist social work practice. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK503 Social Work with Family Groups

    This one-credit, elective course is offered for advanced-year graduate students in social work who are specializing in direct practice with families. The course introduces students to the use of multifamily group therapy in social work practice. An efficient use of often scarce social work resources, this modality provides a unique opportunity to combine professional help with mutual aid within and across families.1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK504 Short-Term Treatment Models in Social Work with Families

    This one-credit elective course is designed to help the advanced-year graduate student in social work who is interested in direct practice with families toward a fuller understanding of the applications of specialized methods of intervention in social work practice with a broad array of families. It is concerned specifically with time-limited methods of intervention, building on knowledge of families in the social environment as considered in SWK500 as well as knowledge related to generalist social work practice. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK505 Psychopharmacology for Social Workers

    Students will be presented with an overview of the current therapeutic use of psychotropic drugs as well as pharmacological terminology and reference books. The clinical use of psychotropic drugs such as narcotic analgesics, the sedative hypnotics, stimulants, anxiolytics, neuroleptics, antidepressants and lithium will be examined. Societal and ethical issues of psychopharmacology will be explored. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK507 Differential Assessment Techniques for Social Workers

    This one-credit elective course is designed to help the student who is interested in direct practice with families toward a fuller understanding of holistic assessment, including theoretical and value foundations as well as practice techniques. It builds on knowledge of families in the social environment as considered in SWK500 as well as knowledge related to generalist social work practice. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK508 Maltreatment in the Family: Social Work Practice

    This one-credit elective course is designed to help the advanced-year graduate student in social work who is interested in direct practice with families toward a fuller understanding of the applications of specialized methods of intervention related to abuse in the family context with a broad array of families. It builds on knowledge of families in the social environment as considered in SWK500 as well as knowledge related to generalist social work practice. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK516 Social Work in Health Care

    This one-credit elective course is designed to help the advanced-year graduate student in social work who is interested in direct practice with families in health care settings toward a fuller understanding of the applications of specialized methods of intervention in social work practice with a broad array of families. It builds on knowledge of families in the social environment as considered in SWK500 as well as knowledge related to generalist social work practice and the current social policy environment in healthcare. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK519 Qualitative Research In Social Work

    This one-credit, elective course for advanced-year graduate students in social work builds on the foundations in social science research as presented in the Master's of Social Work curriculum. Its particular focus is on the critique and practice of qualitative research methods. Students will be introduced to the philosophy behind qualitative research, with attention to its applicability to the study of diverse client groups. Students will develop an understanding of the interpretive perspective through examination of grounded theory, qualitative research design, and methods of data collection, analysis and presentation. 1 C.H., 1 S.H.

  • SWK520 Community Social Needs Assessment

    This course will focus on community needs assessment techniques. In particular students will be exposed to a variety of approaches to needs assessment including social indicators, key informants, community forums and focused groups, and community surveys. Issues associated with particular methods and techniques in using these approaches will be studied. Emphasis will be placed on designing data collection and analysis techniques. Ethical and policy issues will be examined. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK 524 Program Evaluation and Social Work

    This short-term course will develop the students' capacity to be an intelligent consumer and a producer of program evaluation. It provides an in-depth examination of the issues associated with the design and implementation of a program evaluation, introduces a model of outcome measures, examines community needs assessment techniques and provides an framework for a cost benefit analysis. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK525 Information Technology and Social Work Practice I

    This short-term course is the first in a series of information technology courses aimed at developing skills for effective use of computers and information technology in social work practice, research, and the administration of social service programs. Students will become familiar with information processing concepts and develop social work applications using popular microcomputer word processing, spreadsheet, and database management software. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK526 Information Technology and Social Work Practice II

    This short-term course is the second in a series of information technology courses aimed at developing skills for effective use of computers and information technology in social work practice, research, and the administration of social service programs. Students will develop social work applications using popular microcomputer-based web, database management, statistical, and presentation software. In addition, students will be sensitized to the ethical questions and issues arising from the use of information technology. Prerequisites: SWK 525, or permission of the instructor. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK527 Social Entrepreneurship and Social Work

    This course is one of a group of social work elective courses in entrepreneurial social work. This course applies to concepts of social entrepreneurship to social work practice including agency program development and private social work practice. Students will build upon foundation level graduate curriculum in social work where students are exposed to change strategies with agencies and communities. Students will develop an understanding of social entrepreneurship, its application to social work practice, and its difference from social service delivery. It will identify entrepreneurial opportunities that can impact social change and benefit the larger community and society. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK528 Social Work and Non-Profit Leadership

    This course is one of a group of social work elective courses in entrepreneurial social work. This course examines and applies leadership of social entrepreneurial enterprise and its relationship to the social work practice of understanding and addressing social change. Students will build upon foundation level graduate curriculum in social work where students are exposed to change strategies with agencies and communities. Students will utilize this course to develop an understanding of transformational leadership capable of influencing others to bring about change in agencies and communities. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK529 Financial Sustainability of Entrepreneurial Social Work

    This course is one of a group of social work elective courses in entrepreneurial social work. This course introduces financial management of social entrepreneurial enterprise and its relationship to the social work practice of understanding and addressing social change. Students will build upon foundation level graduate curriculum in social work where students are exposed to change strategies with agencies and communities. Students will utilize this course to develop an understanding of multiple sources of financing including grant writing, philanthropy, and fundraising, along with financial management of entrepreneurial opportunities that can impact social change that benefits the larger community and society. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK536 Skills for Working with the New Immigrant Family

    With the increase in the U.S. immigration in the recent years, the number of immigrants and their families needing social services has risen dramatically. Assisting the new immigrants and their families to adjust to their new host environment has been a challenge to social work professionals. This course takes an eco-systems perspective on working with the immigrant family, paying special attention to the interactions between and amongst family members and their social environment. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK538 Practice of Family Group Decision Making I

    In this course students develop an overview of family group decision making (FGDM) in the field of child welfare. They develop an understanding of the implications of FGDM and family-centered social work practice on foster care, adoption and the goal of child permanence. This will include an understanding of the social, cultural, economic, and political factors affecting the quest for permanence in a setting the child perceives to be his or her own family. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK539 Practice of Family Group Decision Making II

    In this course students refine their understanding of the implications of family group decision making (FGDM) and family-centered social work practice on child permanence. They also observe the practice of FGDM and practice the skills necessary to carry it out. Learning includes experience applying the family-in-environment practice perspective in the context of the social, cultural, economic, and political systems affecting the quest for permanence in a setting the child perceives to be his or her own family. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK540 Practice of Family Group Decision Making III

    In this course students refine their understanding of the implications of family group decision making and family-centered social work practice on child permanence and its reciprocal influence on social welfare policy. They also practice the policy change skills necessary to make organizations change in order to carry out the ideals of the Family Decision Making Model as it is sanctioned by the communities in which it operates. Learning includes experiential understanding of the family-in-environment perspective and the macro-level change component of advanced generalist social work practice. The social, cultural, economic, and political factors affecting the quest for permanence in a setting the child perceives to be his or her own family form the context for this consideration of macro-level practice. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK545 Child Permanence and the Family-In-Environment

    Students will acquire the multi-level skills necessary for achieving permanency for children in the child welfare system. They will develop a comprehensive conceptualization of the implications of family-centered social work practice on child permanence. This will include an understanding of the social, cultural, economic and political factors affecting the quest for permanence in a setting the child perceives to be his or her own family. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK559 Social Work Intervention with Substance Abusing Populations: A Systems Approach to Chemical Dependency Treatment

    This course provides students with the knowledge necessary to examine intervention strategies with adult populations of substance abusers. The students will explore the overarching frameworks of substance abuse treatment, integration of the strength perspective for advanced generalist practice with substance abusing populations and its application to gender issues in substance abuse treatment. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK561 Motivational Interviewing Skills: Social Work Strategies in Gender Sensitive Addiction Treatment

    This course provides students with the knowledge necessary to examine motivational interviewing and the stages of change model with adult populations of substance abusers. In addition to integrating the strength perspective students will be introduced to motivational interviewing and its application to gender issues in substance abuse treatment. Prerequisite SWK559 or permission of the instructor. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK573 Publishing and Professional Presentations in Social Work

    This course provides students with the tools needed to disseminate social work knowledge and research findings in a variety of forums, including: peer-reviewed journals, books and book chapters, practitioners' periodicals, juried conferences, and invitational workshops. Ethical considerations specific to disseminating research will be discussed. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK574 Family Mediation

    This one-credit elective course is designed to help the advanced-year graduate social worker who is interested in direct practice with families acquire an understanding of the application of the unique and focused methods of family mediation as they are practiced in forensic and other settings. It builds on knowledge of families in the social environment as well as knowledge related to generalist social work practice. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK575 Clinical Supervision in Social Work

    This course provides students with the knowledge necessary to provide quality, ethical supervision to practicing social workers. Students will explore the purposes of the clinical (as opposed to administrative) aspects of supervision along with methods for achieving those purposes and evaluating supervisory outcomes. In addition, students will be introduced to the professional literature available for their future reference and to methods for supervisors to engage in ongoing professional growth within their own supervisory processes. 1 S.H., 1 C.H.

  • SWK579 Independent Study in Advanced Generalist Social Work Practice

    This is an individualized, independent course of study in an area of advanced generalist social work practice. The area of study may be used to expand upon specialized knowledge gained in previous course-work or practicum experience. The focus of the independent study may be to add further depth to specialized knowledge of a field of practice (e.g. aging, mental health, mental retardation, child welfare and family studies, etc.) or a practice modality (e.g. program administration, clinical supervision, clinical practice, etc.). The area of study will be identified via consultation among the student, a field representative/supervisor, and the student's faculty advisor. The independent study may be conducted under the direction of any social work faculty member. 1-3 S.H., 1-3 C.H.

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